Advanced Technological Education

Professional Development Resources


  • Preparing Your Students for Advanced Technological Education

    In this lesson designed for professional development, learn about the technical skills and “soft” skills used in advanced technology and ways you as a high school teacher might prepare your students for related educational and career pathways. You will watch videos, explore interactive activities, and answer content-related questions to gain insights as to which key competencies students should develop before entering a two-year degree program. You’ll also see how various skills are employed in real-world scenarios and become better prepared yourself to incorporate this information in planning your curriculum.

    Grades: 13+
  • Changing Student Lives Through Advanced Technological Education

    In this lesson designed for professional development, learn about rapidly emerging fields in advanced technology that may interest your students when considering a career. You will watch videos, explore interactive activities, and answer content-related questions to gain insights into various industries that use advanced technology, the kinds of people working in or training for these jobs, and the skills and education needed to succeed. Then you will research local ATE programs that align with your students’ interests and inquire about internships and other firsthand experiences for high school students to evaluate possible career pathways.

    Grades: 13+
  • Active Teaching and Learning

    In this professional development video from Getting Results, Dr. John Bransford, professor of education at the University of Washington School of Education, and an instructor talk about how to engage students. Bransford says engagement involves getting students interested in working on problems they have some knowledge about, followed by reflection on different learning strategies. The instructor is shown facilitating a physics experiment. His students try to predict the outcome of the experiment, and then discuss their findings as a group. Bransford concludes by saying that classroom activities connecting theory with practice help students to value what they learn.

    Grades: 11-13+
  • Utilizing Right and Wrong Answers

    In this professional development video excerpted from Getting Results, a community college instructor explains how he reviews a test with his students by having his students work in groups to discuss answers. The instructor explains that while tests can reveal to him what hasn't been grasped, this group review helps his students reflect on the rationale behind each answer. In addition, the tests help him discover whether goals are met, whether there are other benefits to the lesson, and whether he was successful in teaching the lesson. Once he has discovered the answers to these questions, he can decide whether to adjust the course design.

    Grades: 11-13+
  • Assessing Teaching and Learning

    In this professional development video from Getting Results, Dr. John Bransford, professor of education at the University of Washington School of Education, as well as a community college statistics instructor and a course designer discuss assessment. Bransford explains that learning goals should include not only what is to be learned, but also how students will demonstrate knowledge and how they can be assessed throughout the course. The instructor is shown using questioning strategies to gauge her students’ learning. She explains that she measures her success as an instructor by that of her students. Bransford concludes, saying that the more knowledge teachers have, the more removed their level of understanding might be from that of their students. For this reason, building in assessments throughout the course, to monitor student understanding, helps improve instruction.

    Grades: 11-13+
  • Moving Beyond the Classroom

    In this professional development video from Getting Results, Dr. John Bransford, professor of education at the University of Washington School of Education, as well as instructors and students from an aquarium science class, talk about how to make course content relevant through first-hand experiences with labs and connections to the community. As an example, the instructors bring in an aquarium director as a guest lecturer. The students then conduct an experiment. Afterwards, they go to the aquarium to see the same technology used in a professional context.

    Grades: 11-13+
  • Integrating Disciplines in Project-Based Learning

    In this professional development video from Getting Results, instructors from different disciplines fit content from their disciplines into one integrated project that simulates a real-world problem. The instructors—from physics, technology, math, and communications disciplines—discuss the project and work with their students. One instructor explains that each course revolves around a real-world home insulation problem. The communications instructor, for instance, teaches students to write a formal report on their product. Communication between the instructors is key to integrating the different courses.

    Grades: 11-13+
  • Using Job-Shadowing Experiences

    In this professional development video adapted from Getting Results, a student and a microbiologist talk about the student’s job-shadowing experience in a biotechnology lab. The microbiologist explains how the experience exposes the student to the profession, thus, helping her make decisions about her future career. The student describes how the job-shadowing helps her understand what is involved in a biotechnology job.

    Grades: 11-13+
  • Engaging Students in Lecture and Lab

    In this professional development video from Getting Results, students and their instructors discuss how lab time reinforces what is taught in lecture. One instructor says his goal is to prepare students through lecture, and then apply the learning in a lab. In this video, the students have to understand a mathematical function in order to make a robot work. When students get frustrated in the lab, the instructor guides them with questions. One student says the lab gets results for students by “hammering home” the content. The instructor concurs, saying that he avoids telling his students how to do the problem. Instead, he encourages them to grapple with it themselves.

    Grades: 11-13+
  • Working with Non-traditional Learners

    In this professional development video excerpted from Getting Results, diverse learners study biotechnology at a technical college. The instructor and her students describe the students’ unique backgrounds: an older adult learner with lengthy professional experience in the computer industry, an immigrant student with a master’s degree in microbiology from her native country, and a younger student who had gone as far as he could in his job. The instructor states that examining these diverse backgrounds helps her make the most of each individual’s contribution, particularly in the lab where students work as a team.

    Grades: 11-13+
  • Planning for Outcomes

    In this professional development video from Getting Results, natural resource technology instructors at a community college discuss fitting their courses together. The instructors say that clarifying and communicating outcomes helps them plan courses. They can reinforce skills taught across the program and add additional ones, too. Students talk about how much they appreciate the hands-on, workplace-centered nature of the learning in their program. The video concludes with instructors talking about the goal of teaching skills that are highly relevant to the work world. Building curriculum, they say, is about envisioning and getting these results.

    Grades: 11-13+
  • Teaching With Technology

    In this professional development video from Getting Results, Dr. John Bransford, professor of education at the University of Washington School of Education, as well as an instructor and a student discuss the value of applying what is learned in the classroom. Bransford and the instructor talk about how students are motivated by using their learning to solve real-world problems. The instructor and one of his students discuss the importance of putting what is learned to use. As seen in this video, the students apply their understanding of mathematical functions to program robots via a graphing calculator. By using technology to solve a problem, students experience how hands-on applications can illustrate concepts.

    Grades: 11-13+
  • Visualizing Concepts Through Technology

    In this professional development video from Getting Results, a chemical operations instructor and one of his students discuss how classroom technology can ready students for work in industry. A student tells how a particular technology model in his classroom helps him understand the technology in the field. The class visits a local processing plant where they talk with industry professionals and explore state-of-the-art equipment in action. Finally, the student says that the classroom technology helps him understand this equipment by “boiling it down to the basics.”

    Grades: 11-13+
  • PBCL in an HTML Class

    In this video from Making Learning Real about Problem-Based Case Learning (PBCL), an instructor and a business partner have posed a business problem to an HTML class. The business partner is a local community service organization, Feline Hotline. The problem is that Feline Hotline needs a Web site. Student teams present their solutions to the instructor, the business partner, and a guest expert (a Web design instructor). The students then receive feedback on their work.

    Grades: 11-13+
  • PBCL Stage 6: Resource Development

    In Problem-Based Case Learning (PBCL), students work in teams to develop and present solutions to real-world problems. In this video from Making Learning Real, a Web design class's problem is to build a Web site for a local retail business. The business partner has delivered content for the site and approved designs, allowing students to begin writing HTML code. Students communicate frequently with the business partner and their classmates to be sure they are meeting the needs of the project. The video concludes with the business partner expressing her satisfaction with the students’ work.

    Grades: 11-13+
  • PBCL: Thinking About Evaluation

    With Problem-Based Case Learning (PBCL), students work in teams to develop and present solutions to real-world problems. In this video from Making Learning Real, instructors and a learning scientist discuss ways to evaluate student work in PBCL. One challenge for education is to find a way to evaluate that does not stifle innovation. Another is the need to evaluate how students solve new problems they have never seen before. The solutions that students develop can indicate how well they have learned the material.

    Grades: 11-13+
  • PBCL Stage 8: Evidence of Learning

    In Problem-Based Case Learning (PBCL), students work in teams to develop and present solutions to real-world problems. In this video from Making Learning Real, students in an HTML class present their designs to a business partner for her business's Web site. The class and the business partner provide feedback on each team’s work.

    Grades: 11-13+
  • PBCL Stage 9: Feedback & Evaluation

    With Problem-Based Case Learning (PBCL), students work in teams to develop and present solutions to real-world problems. In this video from Making Learning Real, students in an HTML class present their Web sites to the leader of a local non-profit. Then the instructor explains how she evaluates students’ work and talks about some of the project’s outcomes.

    Grades: 11-13+
  • PBCL Stage 5: Field Insights

    With Problem-Based Case Learning (PBCL), students work in teams to develop and present solutions to real-world problems. In this video from Making Learning Real, an IT instructor and his students talk about how the PBCL methodology helps students learn about new technologies, discover answers on their own, and observe an actual work environment.

    Grades: 11-13+
  • PBCL Stage 2: Framing a Situation for the Classroom

    This video from Making Learning Real on Problem-Based Case Learning (PBCL) shows how instructors and business partners work together to shape problems for students' PBCL projects. Educators and a business partner explain that, when forming a problem, the instructor must consider a timeframe, learning objectives, and resources. The business partner must consider the product he or she wants from the class.

    Grades: 11-13+

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