Crash Course Computer Science


  • hd video

    Compression: Crash Course Computer Science #21

    So last episode we talked about some basic file formats, but what we didn’t talk about is compression. Often files are way too large to be easily stored on hard drives or transferred over the Internet - the solution, unsurprisingly, is to make them smaller. Today, we’re going to talk about lossless compression, which will give you the exact same thing when reassembled, as well as lossy compression, which uses the limitations of human perception to remove less important data. From listening to music and sharing photos, to talking on the phone and even streaming this video right now the ways we use the Internet and our computing devices just wouldn’t be possible without the help of compression.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    Keyboards & Command Line Interfaces: Crash Course Computer Science #22

    Today, we are going to start our discussion on user experience. We've talked a lot in this series about how computers move data around within the computer, but not so much about our role in the process. So today, we're going to look at our earliest form of interaction through keyboards. We'll talk about how the keyboard got its qwerty layout, and then we'll track its evolution in electronic typewriters, and eventually terminals with screens. We are going to focus specifically on text interaction through command line interfaces, and next week we'll take a look at graphics.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    Screens & 2D Graphics: Crash Course Computer Science #23

    Today, we begin our discussion of computer graphics. So, we ended last episode with the proliferation of command line (or text) interfaces, which sometimes used screens, but typically electronic typewriters or teletypes onto paper. But by the early 1960s, a number of technologies were introduced to make screens much more useful, from cathode ray tubes and graphics cards to ASCII art and light pens. This era would mark a turning point in computing - computers were no longer just number crunching machines, but potential assistants interactively augmenting human tasks. This was the dawn of graphical user interfaces which we’ll cover more in a few episodes.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    The Cold War and Consumerism: Crash Course Computer Science #24

    Today we’re going to step back from hardware and software, and take a closer look at how the backdrop of the cold war and space race and the rise of consumerism and globalization brought us from huge, expensive codebreaking machines in the 1940s to affordable handhelds and personal computers in the 1970s. This is an era that saw huge government funded projects - like the race to the moon. And afterward, a shift towards the individual consumer, commoditization of components, and the rise of the Japanese electronics industry.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    The Personal Computer Revolution: Crash Course Computer Science #25

    Today we're going to talk about the birth of personal computing. Up until the early 1970s components were just too expensive, or underpowered, for making a useful computer for an individual, but this would begin to change with the introduction of the Altair 8800 in 1975. In the years that follow, we'll see the founding of Microsoft and Apple and the creation of the 1977 Trinity: The Apple II, Tandy TRS-80, and Commodore PET 2001. These new consumer oriented computers would become a huge hit, but arguably the biggest success of the era came with the release of the IBM PC in 1981. IBM completely changed the industry as its "IBM compatible" open architecture consolidated most of the industry except for, notably, Apple. Apple chose a closed architecture forming the basis of the Mac Vs PC debate that rages today. But in 1984, when Apple was losing marketshare fast it looked for a way to offer a new user experience like none other - which we'll discuss next time.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    Graphical User Interfaces: Crash Course Computer Science #26

    Today, we're going to discuss the critical role graphical user interfaces, or GUIs played in the adoption of computers. Before the mid 1980's the most common way people could interact with their devices was through command line interfaces, which though efficient, aren't really designed for casual users. This all changed with the introduction of the Macintosh by Apple in 1984.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    3D Graphics: Crash Course Computer Science #27

    From polygon count and meshes, to lighting and texturing, there are a lot of considerations in building the 3D objects we see in our movies and video games, but then displaying these 3D objects of a 2D surface adds an additional number of challenges. So we’ll talk about some of the reasons you see occasional glitches in your video games as well as the reason a dedicated graphics processing unit, or GPU, was needed to meet the increasing demand for more and more complex graphics.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    Computer Networks: Crash Course Computer Science #28

    We’re going to begin with computer networks, and how they grew from small groups of connected computers on LAN networks to eventually larger worldwide networks like the ARPANET and even the Internet we know today.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    The Internet: Crash Course Computer Science #29

    Specifically, how that stream of characters you punch into your browser's address bar, like "youtube.com", return a website. Just to clarify, we're talking in a broader sense about that massive network of networks connecting millions of computers together.

    Grades: 9-12
  • The World Wide Web: Crash Course Computer Science #30

    The World Wide Web is built on the foundation of simply linking pages to other pages with hyperlinks, but it is this massive interconnectedness that makes it so powerful. But before the web could become a thing, Tim Berners-Lee would need to invent the web browser at CERN, and search engines would need to be created to navigate these massive directories of information.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    Cybersecurity: Crash Course Computer Science #31

    Cybersecurity is a set of techniques to protect the secrecy, integrity, and availability of computer systems and data against threats. In today’s episode, we’re going to unpack these three goals and talk through some strategies we use like passwords, biometrics, and access privileges to keep our information as secure, but also as accessible, as possible.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    Hackers & Cyber Attacks: Crash Course Computer Science #32

    Not all hackers are malicious cybercriminals intent on stealing your data (these people are known as Black Hats). There are also White Hats, who hunt for bugs, close security holes, and perform security evaluations for companies. And there are a lot of different motivations for hackers.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    Cryptography: Crash Course Computer Science #33

    We’re going to walk you through some common encryption techniques such as the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange, and RSA which are employed to keep your information safe, private, and secure.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    Machine Learning & Artificial Intelligence: Crash Course Computer Science #34

    From spam filters and self-driving cars, to cutting edge medical diagnosis and real-time language translation, there has been an increasing need for our computers to learn from data and apply that knowledge to make predictions and decisions. This is the heart of machine learning which sits inside the more ambitious goal of artificial intelligence.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    Computer Vision: Crash Course Computer Science #35

    Today, we’re going to talk about how computers see. We’ve long known that our digital cameras and smartphones can take incredibly detailed images, but taking pictures is not quite the same thing. For the past half-century, computer scientists have been working to help our computing devices understand the imagery they capture, leading to advancements everywhere, from tracking hands and whole bodies to biometrics to unlock our phones.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    Natural Language Processing: Crash Course Computer Science #36

    As computers play an increasing role in our daily lives there has been a growing demand for voice user interfaces, but speech is also terribly complicated. Vocabularies are diverse, sentence structures can often dictate the meaning of certain words, and computers also have to deal with accents, mispronunciations, and many common linguistic faux pas.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    Robots: Crash Course Computer Science #37

    Robots are often thought of as a technology of the future, but they're already here by the millions in the workplace, our homes, and pretty soon on the roads. We'll discuss the origins of robotics to its proliferation, and even look at some common control designs that were implemented to make them more useful in the workplace.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    Psychology of Computing: Crash Course Computer Science #38

    So today, we’re going to discuss some psychological considerations in building computers, like how to make them easier for humans to use, the uncanny valley problem when humanoid robots gets more and more humanlike, and strategies to make our devices work better with us by incorporating our emotions and even altering our gaze.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    Educational Technology: Crash Course Computer Science #39

    Today we’re going to go a little meta and talk about how computer science can support learning with educational technology. We here at Crash Course are big fans of interactive in-class learning and hands-on experiences, but we also believe in the additive power of educational technology inside and outside the classroom from the Internet itself.

    Grades: 9-12
  • hd video

    The Singularity, Skynet, and the Future of Computing: Crash Course Computer Science #40

    In the past 70 years electronic computing has fundamentally changed how we live our lives, and we believe it’s just getting started. From ubiquitous computing, artificial intelligence, and self-driving cars to brain computer interfaces, wearable computers, and maybe even the singularity there is so much amazing potential on the horizon.

    Grades: 9-12

Brand:
Contributor: