Family and Marriage


  • After Love, by Maxime Kumin

    This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features the poet Maxine Kumin reading her poem “After Love” at the Dodge Poetry Festival. The poem captures a brief moment of tranquility in the life of a married couple. Often compared to the poet Robert Frost, Kumin uses spare, direct language, and careful attention to detail to explore love, loss, and the natural world of her rural New England.

    For a biography of the poet Maxine Kumin, please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

    Grades: 9-12
  • After Making Love We Hear Footsteps, by Galway Kinnell

    This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features the poet Galway Kinnell reading his poem “After Making Love We Hear Footsteps” at the Dodge Poetry Festival. Rhode Island-born Kinnell’s poetry shows the power of love and spirituality flowing through the small moments and interactions of everyday life.

    For a biography of the poet Galway Kinnell, please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

    Grades: 9-12
  • American Wedding, by Joseph Millar

    This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features the poet Joseph Millar reading his poem “American Wedding” at the Dodge Poetry Festival. A father watches his daughter at her wedding, and is filled with mixed emotions. He is proud of her, he loves her, he knows she is happy and in love, but he can’t help feeling the precariousness of her situation as she prepares to embark on adult life.

    For a biography of the poet Joseph Millar, please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

    Grades: 7-12
  • Lake Echo, Dear, by C. D. Wright

    This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features the poet C. D. Wright reads her poem “Lake Echo, Dear” at the Dodge Poetry Festival. Born in the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas in 1949, Wright has developed a style of poetry all her own—both experimental and Southern, implicit in its lyrical utterance and yet grounded in an inherent sense of the unutterable.

    For a biography of the poet C. D. Wright please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

    Grades: 7-12
  • Aunties, by Kevin Young

    This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features poet Kevin Young reading his poem "Aunties" at the Dodge Poetry Festival. “I feel like a poem is made up of poetic and unpoetic language, or unexpected language,” says Kevin Young; “Aunties” is a good example of allusive language, colloquial language, and poetic images all brought together to describe a wonderful lived experience of family.

    For a biography of poet Kevin Young, please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

    Grades: 7-12
  • Blackbottom, by Toi Derricotte

    This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features the poet Toi Derricotte reading her poem “Blackbottom” at the Dodge Poetry Festival. Identity is a central human concern: who am I? Where does identity come from? How much is assigned to us at birth (male, female, black, white, rich, poor), and how much is assigned to us during our lives, as other people try to fit us into stereotypes? How much of our identity do we finally create ourselves?

    For a biography of the poet Toi Derricotte, please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

    Grades: 9-12
  • The Dancing, by Gerald Stern

    This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features the poet Gerald Stern reading his poem "The Dancing" at the Dodge Poetry Festival. A poetry reviewer once wrote about Gerald Stern that his poems “[reveal] his emotions while revealing almost nothing about their origins.” “The Dancing” is filled with emotions that build to a terrible climax—but why?

    For a biography of the poet Gerald Stern, please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

    Grades: 7-12
  • Slow Dance, by Matthew Dickman

    This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features the poet Matthew Dickman reading his poem “Slow Dance” at the Dodge Poetry Festival. “Human beings are meaning-making creatures. We cannot help it. We cannot stop doing it.” This quote from Matthew Dickman could be the motto of everyone who reads poetry: even when you are not quite sure you understand it, you want to find meaning in it, and you do.

    Grades: 7-12
  • One Boy Told Me, by Naomi Shihab Nye

    This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features the poet Naomi Shihab Nye reading her poem "One Boy Told Me" at the Dodge Poetry Festival. “Words can give you something back if you trust them,” says Naomi Shihab Nye; “and if you know that you're not trying to proclaim things all the time, but you're trying to discover things.” “One Boy Told Me” is an example of how Nye’s life-affirming poetry lets someone who doesn’t use formal language proclaim his own meaning.

    For a biography of the poet Naomi Shihab NyeNaomi Shihab Nye please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

    Grades: 7-12
  • Mother's Day, by Daisy Zamora

    This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features native Nicaraguan poet Daisy Zamora reading her poem "Mother’s Day" at the Dodge Poetry Festival. In politics, Daisy Zamora fought for equality and justice by opposing the dictator Somosa in her native Nicaragua, a stance that led to her banishment until the dictator was overthrown. In poetry, Zamora fights for equality and justice by opposing the norms that are dictated to women by society.

    Grades: 7-12
  • Touch Me, by Stanley Kunitz

    This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features the poet Stanley Kunitz reading his poem "Touch me" at the Dodge Poetry Festival. Stanley Kunitz wrote about new life—renewal, shaking off old habits and ideas, and the cycle of life and death. His poetry was always changing, and he continued to write new poems until his death at age 100 in 2006; in fact, he became Poet Laureate at the age of 95.

    For a biography of the poet Stanley Kunitz please visit the Poetry Foundation Web site.

    Grades: 7-12
  • The Lanyard, by Billy Collins

    This video segment from Poetry Everywhere features the poet Billy Collins reading his poem "The Lanyard" at the Dodge Poetry Festival. The poem describes a memory of making a childhood gift at camp for his mother. Using humor and irony, the poem illustrates how ordinary objects can connect to powerful memories.

    Grades: 7-12