The Citi Collection for Financial Capability

The Citi Collection for Financial Capability


This collection of resources, drawn from the best of public television, is designed to engage students in financial awareness, economic empowerment and personal responsibility. The 25 resources that comprise the collection conceptually illustrate and practically apply lessons regarding savings, investment, creditworthiness, entrepreneurship, and commerce.

  • Green Chic | What’s Up in Finance?

    Anna Cohen, a fashion designer with her own line of ecologically friendly designs, wants to expand her business. She is seeking a loan for her business from Mercy Corps, an international microfinance institution. Maggie Reilly, who is a loan officer with Mercy Corps, reviews Anna’s loan and discusses how Anna’s strong personal credit history will support her application for a business loan.

    Grades: 9-12
  • Rags to Riches

    The goal of this game is to launch and run an online T-shirt business, with the help of a loan from a bank. The screens of the game simulate the passage of time in a 12-week business quarter, with each screen presenting a new business scenario or challenge involving issues that impact the company's revenue and expenses. The player can keep track of the company's success by tracking its profit, expenses, and loan standing. At the end of the game, a quarterly report is generated summarizing the business's performance.

    Grades: 7-12
  • The Business of Interest

    In this lesson, students learn about loans, interest on and repayment of loans through a model small business interactive. They will begin by watching a video about how a business owner, who runs a fashion compay based on sustainable practices, uses her excellent credit record to secure a loan. The interactive game has them running their own business and making decisions about the loan they get.  They will also learn about the day-to-day operations of a business.

    Grades: 7-12
  • The Time Value of Money

    Understanding saving, investments and retirement can sometimes be a challenge to young people when their immediate needs and wants easily outweigh long-term financial planning. Riza Laudin, an economics teacher at Herricks High School in Long Island, New York, helps students make personal connections to the benefits of saving early through a lesson on the time value of money. In this lesson, Ana begins saving at age 22 for twelve years, while Shawn saves from ages 34 to 65. Students are challenged to predict who was the better saver. Understanding and applying the principles of compound interest, students learn a new strategy for saving and begin to contemplate their own financial futures.

    Grades: 9-12
  • Bank It or Bust

    The goal of this game is to budget expenses with the aim of saving for a short-term purchase (a car), and to see the results of saving over a long-term for a larger purchase (a home). Players assume the role of a teen working a full-time retail job for the summer. Players develop a weekly budget of expenses, modifying their behavior so as to create savings. Then, players move through the ten weeks of summer vacation, with each week presenting an opportunity for savings or spending.

    Grades: 7-12
  • Risky Business--or Not!

    Find out what it means to buy stock in a company.

    Grades: 7-13+
  • The Business of Credit

    During this lesson, students will apply the basics of credit to managing a small business.

    Grades: 7-13+
  • Pay Credit When Credit is Due

    Students investigate the fundamentals of credit including credit cards, credit ratings and credit management.

    Grades: 7-12
  • The Dealmakers

    This video from What’s Up in Finance? features two teams of high school students competing in a simulation of a multi-billion dollar business deal between two energy companies, as Team Sunoco attempts to acquire, or purchase, Team Tesoro. Sunoco wants to pay a lower price for Tesoro, and Tesoro would like to be sold for a higher price than Sunoco would like to pay. Each team is concerned that they won’t get a good return on the investment if the initial investment is not the right amount.

    Grades: 9-12
  • Moving Out

    This video from What’s Up in Finance? introduces Eddie Romero, a college student with an apartment, a nice car and a band. Eddie is struggling financially, and he wants to figure out how to save enough money to pay for a four-year university. Eddie meets with a financial planner named Louis Barajas to learn how to manage his budget to cover his current expenses and save for the future. This resource is part of the Citi Collection for Financial Capability.

    Grades: 9-12
  • What Can I Afford?

    Students learn to budget and keep track of expeneses. Students use these skills to compare checking account options and cell phone plans to find the one that best suits their needs.

    Grades: 9-12
  • Invest in Yourself

    In this lesson, students learn personal financial management strategies based on budgeting and theoretical concepts involved with budgeting and financial management, including income, expenses, savings, and debt. Students will watch a video, compute different scenarios, and play an interactive game to help them understand the importance of financial responsibility.

    Grades: 7-12
  • Teaching Students About Credit

    Now more than ever, it’s essential that young people know how to use credit cards wisely and manage their debt, before they learn the hard way. This video features Lauren Popkoff, a teacher at Brooklyn College Academy in Brooklyn, New York. As Lauren lifts the veil off of credit, she outlines a lesson she teaches her high school students to arm them with the knowledge they need to make wise financial decisions. In this lesson, Lauren presents the advantages and disadvantages of credit, compares credit card offers with her students, discusses ways to establish credit, and highlights the credit card act of 2009.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Filling Empty Pockets

    Students will  explore the concepts of borrowing and credit with an emphasis on credit cards.  They will learn important concepts  including how to preserve their access to credit and how to avoid "credit trouble." Students also consider the real cost of buying on credit, weighing the costs and benefits of credit purchases against the option of budgeting and saving. Finally, students will consider various real offers made by credit providers and decide which offer, among several, is the best.

    Grades: 9-12
  • The Origin of Banking

    This segment from the PBS documentary The Ascent of Money looks at early Renaissance Italy, when credit came of age, and explores how money lending became the foundation of a new kind of power. Against the backdrop of the powerful Medici family, historian Niall Ferguson describes how credit became a legitimate international business and led to the birth of modern banking.

    Grades: 9-12
  • Taxes--Where Does Your Money Go?

    Learn why the government taxes citizens, where the money goes, and how different income brackets pay different taxes.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • It Costs What?!

    The goal of this game is to compare the cost that interest and fees can add to a purchase when the purchase is made using a credit card. Students compare the costs of using credit cards with varying interest rates, learn about important credit card terminology, and discover ways to responsibly manage credit.

    Grades: 9-12
  • Finance and Responsible Lending

    This lesson teaches high school students about banks and how to have a good credit record. They will also learn about the risks of borrowing money.

    Grades: 9-12
  • The Real Cost of College

    This lesson teaches the basics of budgeting, including understanding how revenue and expenses interact.

    Grades: 7-12

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