Global Oneness Project


The Global Oneness Project collection features films, photo essays, and accompanying lesson plans which explore cultural, social, and environmental issues with a humanistic lens. These multimedia stories explore the world through real life experiences and provide students with an authentic approach to global learning. The curriculum content makes personal and interdisciplinary connections and fosters the development of active, critical thinking. 

  • Repairing the Fabric of Democracy | Lesson Plan | Global Oneness Project

    Students read a short article, "Five Habits to Heal the Heart of Democracy," by Parker Palmer who presents qualities of citizenship that are essential for sustaining democracy in troubled times. Palmer suggests that we must value our differences, draw inspiration and greater understanding from contradictions, and celebrate the power of community building to restore our democratic society.

    In this lesson, students discuss the values and efforts that contribute to a healthy democracy. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Photograph by AMNESIAC_ARTS

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Living with Less Water (Lesson Plan) | Global Oneness Project

    Students watch a short film, When A Town Runs Dry, which documents life in Stratford, a small town in California's Central Valley. A farming community for over a hundred years, Stratford is suffering from a drought that is severely impacting the community, land, and residents' daily lives.

    Currently in its sixth year of drought, the Central Valley is home to the country's most productive agricultural region, containing more than half of all the fruits, vegetables, and nuts grown in the United States. Some farmers are selling land and cutting back on farmed acreage, while others dig deeper wells to maintain crop yields. Groundwater in the area has significantly diminished due to over-use and according to the Los Angeles Times, the water table below Stratford fell 100 feet in two years. Residents are living without running water.

    The film explores the drought through the eyes of three Stratford residents—a farmer, a shopkeeper, and a high school football coach. All three men prepare for an uncertain future.

    In this lesson, students explore the effects of environmental change and consider the ways those changes impact community.

    Grades: 6-13+
  • When a Town Runs Dry | Global Oneness Project

    This short film, When a Town Runs Dry, documents life in Stratford, a small town in California's Central Valley. A farming community for over a hundred years, Stratford is suffering from a drought that is severely impacting the community, land, and residents' daily lives.

    Currently in its sixth year of drought, the Central Valley is home to the country's most productive agricultural region, containing more than half of all the fruits, vegetables, and nuts grown in the United States. Some farmers are selling land and cutting back on farmed acreage, while others dig deeper wells to maintain crop yields. Groundwater in the area has significantly diminished due to over-use and according to the Los Angeles Times, the water table below Stratford fell 100 feet in two years. Residents are living without running water.

    This film explores the drought through the eyes of three Stratford residents—a farmer, a shopkeeper, and a high school football coach. All three men prepare for an uncertain future.

    In the accompanying lesson, students explore the effects of environmental change and consider the ways those changes impact community.

    Grades: 6-13+
  • Drokpa: The Nomadic Mountain People of Tibet by Diane Barker | Global Oneness Project

    Photographer Diane Barker's body of work titled, "Drokpa: The Nomadic Mountain People of Tibet," distills more than a decade of travel to the Tibetan Plateau. From 2000 to the present, Barker has documented the nomads in the region and threats to their traditional lifestyle. Modern Chinese culture, including cell phones and other technology, continues to encroach into the lives of nomads, as the Chinese government enacts its plan to relocate nomads from high-altitude pasturelands into government housing. In classroom discussion, students examine specific aspects of nomadic life and explore what could be lost as ancient cultures disappear.

    Grades: K-13+
  • The Value of Ancient Traditions | Lesson Plan | Global Oneness Project

    In this lesson, students view a photo essay "Drokpa, The Nomadic Mountain People of Tibet," by Diane Barker. From 2000 to the present, Barker has documented the nomads of the Tibetan Plateau and threats to their traditional lifestyle. Modern Chinese culture, including cell phones and other technology, continues to encroach into the lives of nomads, and the Chinese government enacts its plan to relocate nomads from high-altitude pasturelands into government housing. In classroom discussion, students examine specific aspects of nomadic life and explore what could be lost as ancient cultures disappear. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: 9-13+

Brand: