Economics


  • Palm Oil in Myanmar by Taylor Weidman | Global Oneness Project

    In this lesson, students view photos of palm oil production in Myanmar and discuss the human impacts of the industry, the costs to workers and family. They also respond to questions to articulate their points of view around various themes, including cultural displacement, corporate abuses, the effects of development, and human rights. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: K-13+
  • The Beauty of Craft | Global Oneness Project

    Photographer Unnikrishnan Raveendranathen explores the creative process with master artists and craftspeople in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    All sorts of artisans create beautiful, appealing alternatives to mass-produced consumer goods and entertainment. Communities can become more vibrant and resilient when handmade goods and services are created locally.

    Students view a photo essay, "The Beauty of Craft," by Unnikrishnan Raveendranathen, which portrays a number of master artists and craftspeople in the San Francisco Bay area and their passionate commitment to traditional art forms. 

    In the accompanying lesson, students learn about the "maker" and "reskilling" movements and discuss the value of low-technology art and craft forms for both individuals and society. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story. 

    Grades: 6-12
  • Deconstructing Consumerism (Lesson Plan) | Global Oneness Project

    Increased global consumerism has vast environmental, economic, and social repercussions. Thought leaders across the globe investigate the unsustainable cultural values at the root of modern consumption.

    Students watch a 25-minute film, What Would It Look Like? by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about the environmental, economic, and social impacts of global consumerism. 

    In this lesson, students discuss what motivates their own consumer choices as well as the effects of consumerism on the global economy. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • What Would it Look Like | Global Oneness Project

    Increased global consumerism has vast environmental, economic, and social repercussions. Thought leaders across the globe investigate the unsustainable cultural values at the root of modern consumption.

    Students watch a 25-minute film, What Would It Look Like? by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about the environmental, economic, and social impacts of global consumerism. 

    In this lesson, students discuss what motivates their own consumer choices as well as the effects of consumerism on the global economy. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: 6-12
  • Living with Less Water (Lesson Plan) | Global Oneness Project

    Students watch a short film, When A Town Runs Dry, which documents life in Stratford, a small town in California's Central Valley. A farming community for over a hundred years, Stratford is suffering from a drought that is severely impacting the community, land, and residents' daily lives.

    Currently in its sixth year of drought, the Central Valley is home to the country's most productive agricultural region, containing more than half of all the fruits, vegetables, and nuts grown in the United States. Some farmers are selling land and cutting back on farmed acreage, while others dig deeper wells to maintain crop yields. Groundwater in the area has significantly diminished due to over-use and according to the Los Angeles Times, the water table below Stratford fell 100 feet in two years. Residents are living without running water.

    The film explores the drought through the eyes of three Stratford residents—a farmer, a shopkeeper, and a high school football coach. All three men prepare for an uncertain future.

    In this lesson, students explore the effects of environmental change and consider the ways those changes impact community.

    Grades: 6-13+
  • When a Town Runs Dry | Global Oneness Project

    This short film, When a Town Runs Dry, documents life in Stratford, a small town in California's Central Valley. A farming community for over a hundred years, Stratford is suffering from a drought that is severely impacting the community, land, and residents' daily lives.

    Currently in its sixth year of drought, the Central Valley is home to the country's most productive agricultural region, containing more than half of all the fruits, vegetables, and nuts grown in the United States. Some farmers are selling land and cutting back on farmed acreage, while others dig deeper wells to maintain crop yields. Groundwater in the area has significantly diminished due to over-use and according to the Los Angeles Times, the water table below Stratford fell 100 feet in two years. Residents are living without running water.

    This film explores the drought through the eyes of three Stratford residents—a farmer, a shopkeeper, and a high school football coach. All three men prepare for an uncertain future.

    In the accompanying lesson, students explore the effects of environmental change and consider the ways those changes impact community.

    Grades: 6-13+
  • Passionate Pursuits | Lesson Plan | Global Oneness Project

    All sorts of artisans create beautiful, appealing alternatives to mass-produced consumer goods and entertainment. Communities can become more vibrant and resilient when handmade goods and services are created locally.

    Students view a photo essay, "The Beauty of Craft," by Unnikrishnan Raveendranathen, which portrays a number of master artists and craftspeople in the San Francisco Bay area and their passionate commitment to traditional art forms. 

    In this lesson, students learn about the "maker" and "reskilling" movements and discuss the value of low-technology art and craft forms for both individuals and society. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story. 

    Grades: 9-13+

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