Environmental Science


  • Palm Oil in Myanmar by Taylor Weidman | Global Oneness Project

    In this lesson, students view photos of palm oil production in Myanmar and discuss the human impacts of the industry, the costs to workers and family. They also respond to questions to articulate their points of view around various themes, including cultural displacement, corporate abuses, the effects of development, and human rights. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: K-13+
  • Yukon Kings | Global Oneness Project

    Students watch a short film, Yukon Kings by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about the challenges facing Ray Waska, a Yupi’k fisherman, and his community as the fish stocks of Alaska’s Yukon Delta diminish.  

    In this lesson, students learn about how the cultural traditions of Native Alaskans are linked with local ecosystems. Students debate the need to respect and protect tradition vs. accepting change. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

     

    Grades: 6-12
  • Passionate Pursuits | Lesson Plan | Global Oneness Project

    All sorts of artisans create beautiful, appealing alternatives to mass-produced consumer goods and entertainment. Communities can become more vibrant and resilient when handmade goods and services are created locally.

    Students view a photo essay, "The Beauty of Craft," by Unnikrishnan Raveendranathen, which portrays a number of master artists and craftspeople in the San Francisco Bay area and their passionate commitment to traditional art forms. 

    In this lesson, students learn about the "maker" and "reskilling" movements and discuss the value of low-technology art and craft forms for both individuals and society. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story. 

    Grades: 9-13+
  • The Beauty of Craft | Global Oneness Project

    Photographer Unnikrishnan Raveendranathen explores the creative process with master artists and craftspeople in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    All sorts of artisans create beautiful, appealing alternatives to mass-produced consumer goods and entertainment. Communities can become more vibrant and resilient when handmade goods and services are created locally.

    Students view a photo essay, "The Beauty of Craft," by Unnikrishnan Raveendranathen, which portrays a number of master artists and craftspeople in the San Francisco Bay area and their passionate commitment to traditional art forms. 

    In the accompanying lesson, students learn about the "maker" and "reskilling" movements and discuss the value of low-technology art and craft forms for both individuals and society. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story. 

    Grades: 6-12
  • Rethinking the Fabrics We Wear | Lesson Plan | Global Oneness Project

    Students view a photo essay, "The Art of Making Wool," by Mark Andrew Boyer, depicting the story of a sheep farmer in California who educates the public about wool and fiber arts. 

    In this lesson, students examine natural and synthetic fibers. Students explore the photo essay in groups and discuss how the sheep farmer offers an alternative to mass production with a focus on the themes of resiliency and sustainability. As an activity, students are asked to bring to class one sample of a natural fabric and one sample of a synthetic fabric. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

     

    Grades: 9-13+
  • The Art of Making Wool | Photo Essay | Global Oneness Project

    Local textile cultures called "fibersheds" offer an alternative to mass production by seeking to utilize regional agriculture, enhance ecological balance, and strengthen communities.

    Students view a photo essay, "The Art of Making Wool," by Mark Andrew Boyer, depicting the story of a sheep farmer in California who educates the public about wool and fiber arts. 

    In this lesson, students examine natural and synthetic fibers. Students explore the photo essay in groups and discuss how the sheep farmer offers an alternative to mass production with a focus on the themes of resiliency and sustainability. As an activity, students are asked to bring to class one sample of a natural fabric and one sample of a synthetic fabric. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

     

    Grades: 6-12
  • Ancient and Modern Worlds (Lesson Plan) | Global Oneness Project

    In an age of rising populations and climate change, global food security is a major concern. New farming technologies and market-based agriculture provide one answer while traditional farming practices and natural resource management provide another.

    Students watch the film,  A Thousand Suns by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about the traditional farmers of the African Rift Valley and their unique world-view.

    In this lesson, students examine the impacts of globalization and climate change on traditional farming in the Gamo Highlands of the Rift Valley. Students identify ways that Gamo farming is linked to a unique holistic worldview and debate whether globalization is having a positive or negative impact on Gamo culture. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

     

    Grades: 9-13+
  • A Thousand Suns | Global Oneness Project

    In an age of rising populations and climate change, global food security is a major concern. New farming technologies and market-based agriculture provide one answer while traditional farming practices and natural resource management provide another. 

    Students watch the film,  A Thousand Suns by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about the traditional farmers of the African Rift Valley and their unique world-view.

    In this lesson, students examine the impacts of globalization and climate change on traditional farming in the Gamo Highlands of the Rift Valley. Students identify ways that Gamo farming is linked to a unique holistic worldview and debate whether globalization is having a positive or negative impact on Gamo culture. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

     

    Grades: 6-12
  • A Vanishing Island (Lesson Plan) | Global Oneness Project

    Students watch a 9-minute film, Isle de Jean Charles by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about a tiny island community off the Louisiana coast. The film explores the changes taking place on the island through the lives of two residents whose families are facing a future where rising seas, coastal erosion, and storms are threatening to wash their home away. 

    In this lesson, students discuss the effects of hurricanes and the advantages and disadvantages for living near the coast. Students will participate in classroom discussions and explore the themes of cultural displacement and the effects of environmental change. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Isle de Jean Charles | Global Oneness Project

    Students watch a 9-minute film, Isle de Jean Charles by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about a tiny island community off the Louisiana coast. The film explores the changes taking place on the island through the lives of two residents whose families are facing a future where rising seas, coastal erosion, and storms are threatening to wash their home away. 

    In the accompanying lesson, students discuss the effects of hurricanes and the advantages and disadvantages for living near the coast. Students will participate in classroom discussions and explore the themes of cultural displacement and the effects of environmental change. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: 6-12
  • Deconstructing Consumerism (Lesson Plan) | Global Oneness Project

    Increased global consumerism has vast environmental, economic, and social repercussions. Thought leaders across the globe investigate the unsustainable cultural values at the root of modern consumption.

    Students watch a 25-minute film, What Would It Look Like? by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about the environmental, economic, and social impacts of global consumerism. 

    In this lesson, students discuss what motivates their own consumer choices as well as the effects of consumerism on the global economy. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • What Would it Look Like | Global Oneness Project

    Increased global consumerism has vast environmental, economic, and social repercussions. Thought leaders across the globe investigate the unsustainable cultural values at the root of modern consumption.

    Students watch a 25-minute film, What Would It Look Like? by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about the environmental, economic, and social impacts of global consumerism. 

    In this lesson, students discuss what motivates their own consumer choices as well as the effects of consumerism on the global economy. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: 6-12
  • Living with Less Water (Lesson Plan) | Global Oneness Project

    Students watch a short film, When A Town Runs Dry, which documents life in Stratford, a small town in California's Central Valley. A farming community for over a hundred years, Stratford is suffering from a drought that is severely impacting the community, land, and residents' daily lives.

    Currently in its sixth year of drought, the Central Valley is home to the country's most productive agricultural region, containing more than half of all the fruits, vegetables, and nuts grown in the United States. Some farmers are selling land and cutting back on farmed acreage, while others dig deeper wells to maintain crop yields. Groundwater in the area has significantly diminished due to over-use and according to the Los Angeles Times, the water table below Stratford fell 100 feet in two years. Residents are living without running water.

    The film explores the drought through the eyes of three Stratford residents—a farmer, a shopkeeper, and a high school football coach. All three men prepare for an uncertain future.

    In this lesson, students explore the effects of environmental change and consider the ways those changes impact community.

    Grades: 6-13+
  • When a Town Runs Dry | Global Oneness Project

    This short film, When a Town Runs Dry, documents life in Stratford, a small town in California's Central Valley. A farming community for over a hundred years, Stratford is suffering from a drought that is severely impacting the community, land, and residents' daily lives.

    Currently in its sixth year of drought, the Central Valley is home to the country's most productive agricultural region, containing more than half of all the fruits, vegetables, and nuts grown in the United States. Some farmers are selling land and cutting back on farmed acreage, while others dig deeper wells to maintain crop yields. Groundwater in the area has significantly diminished due to over-use and according to the Los Angeles Times, the water table below Stratford fell 100 feet in two years. Residents are living without running water.

    This film explores the drought through the eyes of three Stratford residents—a farmer, a shopkeeper, and a high school football coach. All three men prepare for an uncertain future.

    In the accompanying lesson, students explore the effects of environmental change and consider the ways those changes impact community.

    Grades: 6-13+
  • Drokpa: The Nomadic Mountain People of Tibet by Diane Barker | Global Oneness Project

    Photographer Diane Barker's body of work titled, "Drokpa: The Nomadic Mountain People of Tibet," distills more than a decade of travel to the Tibetan Plateau. From 2000 to the present, Barker has documented the nomads in the region and threats to their traditional lifestyle. Modern Chinese culture, including cell phones and other technology, continues to encroach into the lives of nomads, as the Chinese government enacts its plan to relocate nomads from high-altitude pasturelands into government housing. In classroom discussion, students examine specific aspects of nomadic life and explore what could be lost as ancient cultures disappear.

    Grades: K-13+
  • The Value of Ancient Traditions | Lesson Plan | Global Oneness Project

    In this lesson, students view a photo essay "Drokpa, The Nomadic Mountain People of Tibet," by Diane Barker. From 2000 to the present, Barker has documented the nomads of the Tibetan Plateau and threats to their traditional lifestyle. Modern Chinese culture, including cell phones and other technology, continues to encroach into the lives of nomads, and the Chinese government enacts its plan to relocate nomads from high-altitude pasturelands into government housing. In classroom discussion, students examine specific aspects of nomadic life and explore what could be lost as ancient cultures disappear. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Resiliency Among the Salmon People (Lesson Plan) | Global Oneness Project

    Students watch a short film, Yukon Kings by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about the challenges facing Ray Waska, a Yupi’k fisherman, and his community as the fish stocks of Alaska’s Yukon Delta diminish.  

    In this lesson, students learn about how the cultural traditions of Native Alaskans are linked with local ecosystems. Students debate the need to respect and protect tradition vs. accepting change. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

     

    Grades: 9-13+

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