Sociology


  • Palm Oil in Myanmar by Taylor Weidman | Global Oneness Project

    In this lesson, students view photos of palm oil production in Myanmar and discuss the human impacts of the industry, the costs to workers and family. They also respond to questions to articulate their points of view around various themes, including cultural displacement, corporate abuses, the effects of development, and human rights. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: K-13+
  • Welcome to Canada | Global Oneness Project

    Students watch a 19-minute documentary that tells the story of Mohammed Alsaleh, a young Syrian refugee granted asylum in Canada in 2014, who is now counseling newly arrived refugees.

    In this lesson, students explore through classroom discussions the themes of cultural displacement, human rights, and resilience. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: 9-12
  • A Refugee's Story (Lesson Plan) | Global Oneness Project

    Students watch a 19-minute documentary that tells the story of Mohammed Alsaleh, a young Syrian refugee granted asylum in Canada in 2014, who is now counseling newly arrived refugees.

    In this lesson, students explore through classroom discussions the themes of cultural displacement, human rights, and resilience. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Five Habits to Heal the Heart of Democracy By Parker Palmer | Global Oneness Project

    In this article, Parker Palmer presents qualities of citizenship that are essential for sustaining democracy in troubled times. Palmer suggests that we must value our differences, draw inspiration and greater understanding from contradictions, and celebrate the power of community building to restore our democratic society.

    Photograph by AMNESIAC_ARTS

    Grades: 6-12
  • Repairing the Fabric of Democracy | Lesson Plan | Global Oneness Project

    Students read a short article, "Five Habits to Heal the Heart of Democracy," by Parker Palmer who presents qualities of citizenship that are essential for sustaining democracy in troubled times. Palmer suggests that we must value our differences, draw inspiration and greater understanding from contradictions, and celebrate the power of community building to restore our democratic society.

    In this lesson, students discuss the values and efforts that contribute to a healthy democracy. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Photograph by AMNESIAC_ARTS

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Drokpa: The Nomadic Mountain People of Tibet by Diane Barker | Global Oneness Project

    Photographer Diane Barker's body of work titled, "Drokpa: The Nomadic Mountain People of Tibet," distills more than a decade of travel to the Tibetan Plateau. From 2000 to the present, Barker has documented the nomads in the region and threats to their traditional lifestyle. Modern Chinese culture, including cell phones and other technology, continues to encroach into the lives of nomads, as the Chinese government enacts its plan to relocate nomads from high-altitude pasturelands into government housing. In classroom discussion, students examine specific aspects of nomadic life and explore what could be lost as ancient cultures disappear.

    Grades: K-13+
  • Recording a Dying Language (Lesson Plan) | Global Oneness Project

    At a rapid rate, indigenous languages around the world are becoming endangered. Individuals, linguists, and organizations are developing ways to preserve and rehabilitate native languages and cultures.

    Students watch a 9-minute film, Marie's Dictionary by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about a Native American woman who is the last fluent speaker of the Wukchumni language and the dictionary she created to keep her language alive. 

    In this lesson, students participate in classroom discussions and explore the themes of identity, preservation of a culture, and endangered languages. Reflective writing prompts are also offered for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Marie's Dictionary | Global Oneness Project

    At a rapid rate, indigenous languages around the world are becoming endangered. Individuals, linguists, and organizations are developing ways to preserve and rehabilitate native languages and cultures.

    Students watch a 9-minute film, Marie's Dictionary by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about a Native American woman who is the last fluent speaker of the Wukchumni language and the dictionary she created to keep her language alive. 

    In this lesson, students participate in classroom discussions and explore the themes of identity, preservation of a culture, and endangered languages. Reflective writing prompts are also offered for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: 6-12
  • Exploring Cultural Sustainability (Lesson Plan Resource) | Global Oneness Project

    Social changes can be affected by a variety of influences, including exposure to other cultures, available resources, and environmental conditions. Some changes may impact the sustainability of a society and the environment on which it depends.

    Students view a photo essay, "Mongolia’s Nomads," by Taylor Weidman, which highlights Mongolian pastoral herders, one of the world’s last remaining nomadic cultures.

    In this lesson, students explore the concept of cultural sustainability and the nomadic way of life of present-day Mongolian pastoral herders. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

     

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Mongolia's Nomads by Taylor Weidman | Photo Essay | Global Oneness Project

    Social changes can be affected by a variety of influences, including exposure to other cultures, available resources, and environmental conditions. Some changes may impact the sustainability of a society and the environment on which it depends.

    Students view a photo essay, "Mongolia’s Nomads," by Taylor Weidman, which highlights Mongolian pastoral herders, one of the world’s last remaining nomadic cultures.

    In this lesson, students explore the concept of cultural sustainability and the nomadic way of life of present-day Mongolian pastoral herders. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

     

    Grades: 6-12
  • Sports for Social Change (Lesson Plan) | Global Oneness Project

    Students watch a short film, A Game for Life by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about an innovative soccer program in the poor neighborhood of Port Elizabeth, South Africa, that helps to educate local youth about HIV/AIDS prevention.

    In this lesson, students explore how participation in team sports can help empower youth in other areas of their lives. Students identify principles of how young people learn and discuss the ties between sports, civic engagement, and HIV/AIDS prevention. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

     

    Grades: 9-13+
  • A Game for Life | Global Oneness Project

    Nolusindiso "Titie" Plaatjie knows that soccer can help kids "stay away from things that could destroy their lives" because that's just what it did for her. 

    Students watch a short film, A Game for Life by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about an innovative soccer program in the poor neighborhood of Port Elizabeth, South Africa, where "Titie" helps to educate local youth about HIV/AIDS prevention.

    In this lesson, students explore how participation in team sports can help empower youth in other areas of their lives. Students identify principles of how young people learn and discuss the ties between sports, civic engagement, and HIV/AIDS prevention. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

     

    Grades: 6-12
  • Building a Community of Trust (Lesson Plan) | Global Oneness Project

    Youth are kept on the margins of society in urban areas where violence and gang activity is high. Organizations and individuals who focus on community youth development and conflict resolution can transform violence into peace.

    Students watch a short film, Barrio de Paz by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about a retired nun and her transformative work with youth gangs in Ecuador. 

    In this lesson, students explore how respect, trust, and love can transform youth violence. Through classroom discussion, students examine reasons why young people join gangs and ways those instincts can become the foundation for creative participation in society. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

     

    Grades: 9-12
  • Barrio de Paz | Global Oneness Project

    Students watch a short film, Barrio de Paz by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, which tells the story of peace worker Nelsa Libertad Curbelo and the city's gang youth, who have left behind a life of crime to come together and provide services to their struggling community. Loved like a mother, Nelsa has helped the gangs channel their need for unity, structure, and love into the power to participate in society.

    In this lesson, students explore how respect, trust, and love can transform youth violence. Through classroom discussion, students examine reasons why young people join gangs and ways those instincts can become the foundation for creative participation in society. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

     

     

    Grades: 6-12
  • A Tapestry of Multicultural Diversity (Lesson Plan Resource) | Global Oneness Project

    With a long history of immigration, New York City contains one of the most culturally diverse populations in the world, representing a wide variety of religious and faith communities.

    Students view a photo essay, "Belief," by Caleb Ferguson, which explores photos of New Yorkers celebrating various cultural festivities. 

    In this lesson, students discuss multiculturalism and the ways in which they celebrate diversity. Students view the photo essay in pairs or small groups and are given reflective writing prompts for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

     

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Belief by Caleb Ferguson | Global Oneness Project

    With a long history of immigration, New York City contains one of the most culturally diverse populations in the world, representing a wide variety of religious and faith communities.

    Students view a photo essay, "Belief," by Caleb Ferguson, which explores photos of New Yorkers celebrating various cultural festivities. 

    In this lesson, students discuss multiculturalism and the ways in which they celebrate diversity. Students view the photo essay in pairs or small groups and are given reflective writing prompts for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

     

    Grades: 6-12
  • A Vanishing Island (Lesson Plan) | Global Oneness Project

    Students watch a 9-minute film, Isle de Jean Charles by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about a tiny island community off the Louisiana coast. The film explores the changes taking place on the island through the lives of two residents whose families are facing a future where rising seas, coastal erosion, and storms are threatening to wash their home away. 

    In this lesson, students discuss the effects of hurricanes and the advantages and disadvantages for living near the coast. Students will participate in classroom discussions and explore the themes of cultural displacement and the effects of environmental change. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Isle de Jean Charles | Global Oneness Project

    Students watch a 9-minute film, Isle de Jean Charles by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about a tiny island community off the Louisiana coast. The film explores the changes taking place on the island through the lives of two residents whose families are facing a future where rising seas, coastal erosion, and storms are threatening to wash their home away. 

    In the accompanying lesson, students discuss the effects of hurricanes and the advantages and disadvantages for living near the coast. Students will participate in classroom discussions and explore the themes of cultural displacement and the effects of environmental change. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: 6-12
  • Deconstructing Consumerism (Lesson Plan) | Global Oneness Project

    Increased global consumerism has vast environmental, economic, and social repercussions. Thought leaders across the globe investigate the unsustainable cultural values at the root of modern consumption.

    Students watch a 25-minute film, What Would It Look Like? by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about the environmental, economic, and social impacts of global consumerism. 

    In this lesson, students discuss what motivates their own consumer choices as well as the effects of consumerism on the global economy. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • What Would it Look Like | Global Oneness Project

    Increased global consumerism has vast environmental, economic, and social repercussions. Thought leaders across the globe investigate the unsustainable cultural values at the root of modern consumption.

    Students watch a 25-minute film, What Would It Look Like? by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, about the environmental, economic, and social impacts of global consumerism. 

    In this lesson, students discuss what motivates their own consumer choices as well as the effects of consumerism on the global economy. Reflective writing prompts are also included for students to demonstrate their understanding of the story.

    Grades: 6-12

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