Mexican Revolution


  • The Storm That Swept Mexico | Lesson Plan: Revolutionary Women

    “I think…without the women, there would be no Revolution.”

    — Elena Poniatowska

    Women constitute half of the world’s population yet their contributions to major social, cultural and political events are often overlooked, misunderstood, misrepresented, or undocumented. In this lesson, students will discover why women’s participation was crucial to the Mexican Revolution, and how women’s ability to contribute to society changed during the revolutionary period. Through the film The Storm That Swept Mexico and multimedia extensions, students will explore how gender shapes our understanding of history and continues to impact expectations and opportunities for individuals in the present.

     

    Grades: 9-13+
  • The Storm that Swept Mexico: Revolutionary Women | Media Gallery

    Women constitute half of the world’s population yet their contributions to major social, cultural and political events are often overlooked, misunderstood, misrepresented, or undocumented. In this lesson accompanied by a film clip adapted from 'The Storm that Swept Mexico', students will discover why women’s participation was crucial to the Mexican Revolution, and how women’s ability to contribute to society changed during the revolutionary period. Through the multimedia extensions, students will explore how gender shapes our understanding of history and continues to impact expectations and opportunities for individuals in the present.

    REVOLUTIONARY WOMEN: EDUCATOR GUIDE AND LESSON PLAN

    Grades: 9-12
  • The Storm That Swept Mexico | Lesson Plan: Revolutionary Art

    “Their work doesn’t remain on the canvas, it goes much further than that. They try to envision a new reality.”

    — Laura Matute Gonzalez (Art Historian)

    Following the Mexican Revolution, the Mexican government supported the development of a new school of art to break with the dominance of the European tradition. This new movement sought to create a “real” Mexican art that would strengthen and reaffirm Mexican identity and the values of the Revolution. The Mexican Muralist movement was born as a means to provide a visual narrative of the post-Revolutionary vision of Mexican history and was driven by the ideal that art should be “by the public, for the public.” In this lesson, students will examine the use of art as historical narrative and social commentary, and create a mural inspired by the Mexican Muralist movement.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • The Storm that Swept Mexico: Revolutionary Art | Media Gallery

    Following the Mexican Revolution, the Mexican government supported the development of a new school of art to break with the dominance of the European tradition. This new movement sought to create a “real” Mexican art that would strengthen and reaffirm Mexican identity and the values of the Revolution. The Mexican Muralist movement was born as a means to provide a visual narrative of the post-Revolutionary vision of Mexican history and was driven by the ideal that art should be “by the public, for the public.” In this lesson accompanied by a film clip from the documentary 'The Storm that Swept Mexico', students will examine the use of art as historical narrative and social commentary, and create a mural inspired by the Mexican Muralist movement.

    REVOLUTIONARY ART: EDUCATOR GUIDE AND LESSON PLAN

    Grades: 9-12
  • The Storm That Swept Mexico | Lesson Plan: Revolutionary Leaders

    “The oppression was tremendous. That’s why those of us who joined the Revolution in defense of the nation didn’t do it out of bravery or pride but out of necessity.”

    — Galo Pacheco Valle (Zapatista Veteran)

    When does working for social change become revolution? In this lesson, students will study key figures from the Mexican Revolution, including Emiliano Zapata and Pancho Villa, and discuss what motivated them to take action and the broad range of ways that individuals stand up for their principles and beliefs. Using excerpts from the film The Storm that Swept Mexico as a guide, students will also consider how contemporary revolutionaries are harnessing the power of digital media to achieve their goals and will develop and implement their own strategies to work for social change.

     

    Grades: 9-13+
  • The Storm that Swept Mexico: Revolutionary Leaders | Media Gallery

    When does working for social change become revolution? In this lesson, accompanied by a the film clip adapted from 'The Storm that Swept Mexico', students will study key figures from the Mexican Revolution, including Emiliano Zapata and Pancho Villa, and discuss what motivated them to take action and the broad range of ways that individuals stand up for their principles and beliefs. Students will also consider how contemporary revolutionaries are harnessing the power of digital media to achieve their goals and will develop and implement their own strategies to work for social change.

    REVOLUTIONARY LEADERS: EDUCATOR GUIDE AND LESSON PLAN

    Grades: 9-12
  • The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo | Lesson Plan: Personal or Political?

    "They thought I was a Surrealist, but I wasn't. I never painted dreams. I painted my own reality." - Frida Kahlo

    The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo is an intimate biography of a woman who gracefully balanced a private life of illness and pain against a public persona that was flamboyant, irreverent, and world-renowned. Kahlo was an eyewitness to a unique pairing of revolution and renaissance that defined the times in which she lived.

    In this lesson plan, students will consider what makes art political, debate the relevance of the term "political art" to Frida Kahlo’s work, and create their own self-portraits using the style of Frida Kahlo as inspiration.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo | Media Gallery

    The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo is an intimate biography of a woman who gracefully balanced a private life of illness and pain against a public persona that was flamboyant, irreverent, and world-renowned. Kahlo was an eyewitness to a unique pairing of revolution and renaissance that defined the times in which she lived.

    In this lesson plan, students will consider what makes art political, debate the relevance of the term "political art" to Frida Kahlo’s work, and create their own self-portraits using the style of Frida Kahlo as inspiration.

    FRIDA: EDUCATOR GUIDE AND LESSON PLAN

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Orozco: Man of Fire | Lesson Plan: Bearing Witness through Public Art

    "The highest, the most logical, the purest form of painting is the mural. It is, too, the most disinterested form, for it cannot be made a matter of private gain: it cannot be hidden away for the benefit of a certain privileged few. It is for the people. It is for all."

    - José Clemente Orozco

    José Clemente Orozco was one of the primary artistic innovators of the twentieth century. Along with his fellow Mexican muralists, he revived the fresco tradition. Unlike Italian Renaissance frescos, which celebrated a unified vision of the world and humanity’s place within it, Orozco’s frescos express a modernist sensibility that questions and deconstructs. He forged an original and remarkable synthesis in monumental murals that are imbued with beauty, irony and a critical spirit.

    Grades: 9-13+

Brand: Latino Public Broadcasting