Women's Studies


  • Rebel: Loreta Velazquez Civil War Soldier and Spy | Lesson Plan: Hidden Histories

    “What a woman may do if only she dares, and dares to do greatly.” - Loreta Velazquez

    Rebel: Loreta Velazquez Civil War Soldier and Spy, the true story of Loreta Velazquez, Confederate soldier turned Union Spy.

    Shrouded in mystery and long the subject of debate, the amazing story of Loreta Velazquez, confederate Soldier turned Union Spy, is one of the Civil War’s most gripping forgotten narratives. While the U.S. military may have recently lifted the ban on women in combat, Loreta Janeta Velazquez, a Cuban immigrant from New Orleans, was fighting in battle 150 years ago – one of an estimated 1000 women who secretly served as soldiers during the American Civil War. Who was she? Why did she fight? And what made her so dangerous she has been virtually erased from history? Directed by María Agui Carter, REBEL is the story of a woman, a myth, and the politics of national memory.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Rebel: Loreta Velazquez Civil War Soldier and Spy | Media Gallery

    It is estimated that between 500 and 1,000 women went into military service during the American Civil War, yet their contributions to major events of that era are often overlooked, misunderstood, misrepresented, or undocumented. Using excerpts from the documentary film Rebel: Loreta Velazquez Civil War Soldier and Spy and the remarkable story of Loreta Velazquez as a guide, students will: consider how factors such as gender and race shape our understanding of history.

    REBEL EDUCATOR GUIDE AND LESSON PLAN

    Grades: 6-12
  • The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo | Lesson Plan: Personal or Political?

    "They thought I was a Surrealist, but I wasn't. I never painted dreams. I painted my own reality." - Frida Kahlo

    The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo is an intimate biography of a woman who gracefully balanced a private life of illness and pain against a public persona that was flamboyant, irreverent, and world-renowned. Kahlo was an eyewitness to a unique pairing of revolution and renaissance that defined the times in which she lived.

    In this lesson plan, students will consider what makes art political, debate the relevance of the term "political art" to Frida Kahlo’s work, and create their own self-portraits using the style of Frida Kahlo as inspiration.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo | Media Gallery

    The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo is an intimate biography of a woman who gracefully balanced a private life of illness and pain against a public persona that was flamboyant, irreverent, and world-renowned. Kahlo was an eyewitness to a unique pairing of revolution and renaissance that defined the times in which she lived.

    In this lesson plan, students will consider what makes art political, debate the relevance of the term "political art" to Frida Kahlo’s work, and create their own self-portraits using the style of Frida Kahlo as inspiration.

    FRIDA: EDUCATOR GUIDE AND LESSON PLAN

    Grades: 9-13+
  • The Storm That Swept Mexico | Lesson Plan: Revolutionary Women

    “I think…without the women, there would be no Revolution.”

    — Elena Poniatowska

    Women constitute half of the world’s population yet their contributions to major social, cultural and political events are often overlooked, misunderstood, misrepresented, or undocumented. In this lesson, students will discover why women’s participation was crucial to the Mexican Revolution, and how women’s ability to contribute to society changed during the revolutionary period. Through the film The Storm That Swept Mexico and multimedia extensions, students will explore how gender shapes our understanding of history and continues to impact expectations and opportunities for individuals in the present.

     

    Grades: 9-13+
  • The Storm that Swept Mexico: Revolutionary Women | Media Gallery

    Women constitute half of the world’s population yet their contributions to major social, cultural and political events are often overlooked, misunderstood, misrepresented, or undocumented. In this lesson accompanied by a film clip adapted from 'The Storm that Swept Mexico', students will discover why women’s participation was crucial to the Mexican Revolution, and how women’s ability to contribute to society changed during the revolutionary period. Through the multimedia extensions, students will explore how gender shapes our understanding of history and continues to impact expectations and opportunities for individuals in the present.

    REVOLUTIONARY WOMEN: EDUCATOR GUIDE AND LESSON PLAN

    Grades: 9-12
  • Children of Giant | Lesson Plan: Subverting and Reinforcing Stereotypes

    "They were looking to make me dark and a little bit more Mexican. The way they thought Mexicans were."

    - Elsa Cardenas (actor who portrayed ‘Juana’ in Giant) 

     

    Based on the controversial Edna Ferber novel of the same name, Giant did not shy from the strong social issues experienced throughout post-WWII America—it brought to the screen an unflinching look at racism, early feminism, and class divisions—daring themes for movie audiences at the time. In this lesson, students will learn about the social and cultural tensions in the story and on the production of the film as discussed in the documentary Children of Giant. Through the learning activities, they will examine the ongoing social impact of stereotypes in film and media and analyze how George Stevens and the makers of Giant both reinforced and attempted to subvert common and pernicious stereotypes of race, class, and gender in 1950’s America.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Children of Giant: Stereotypes | Media Gallery

    Children of Giant unearths the deeply wrought emotions surrounding the de-facto segregation of Anglos and Latinos in the small West Texas town of Marfa, before, during, and after the month-long production of George Stevens’ 1956 feature film, Giant, which tells the story of three generations of a powerful Texas ranching dynasty. Based on Edna Ferber’s controversial novel, Giant was a different kind of western, one that took an unflinching look at feminism and class divisions and one of the first films to explore the racial divide between Anglos and Mexican Americans in the Southwest. In this lesson, students will understand the ongoing social impact of stereotypes in film and media and how George Stevens and the makers of Giant both reinforced and attempted to subvert common and pernicious stereotypes of race, class, and gender in 1950’s America. 

    GIANT: STEREOTYPES EDUCATOR GUIDE AND LESSON PLAN

     

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Children of Giant | Lesson Plan: Intersectionality On Screen and Off

    "People went to the theater to see Elizabeth Taylor, and what they got was an unrelenting feminist message and a message for social justice."

    - M. G. Lord, Writer

    In the summer of 1955, Hollywood movie crews rolled into the small, West Texas town of Marfa to film, Giant, based on Edna Ferber’s best-selling but controversial novel. Children of Giant illustrates how Edith Ferber’s personal experience of discrimination, stemming from her intersecting identities as a Jewish woman, and her collaborative research into the lives and experiences of Mexican-Americans and Anglo-Americans in Texas, influenced her development of complex characters such as Juana and Leslie. It also reveals the Intersectionality of discrimination behind the lens through the experiences of the citizens of Marfa as well as the actor Elsa Cardenas, who played Juana.

     

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Children of Giant: Intersectionality | Media Gallery

    Children of Giant unearths the deeply wrought emotions surrounding the de-facto segregation of Anglos and Latinos in the small West Texas town of Marfa, before, during, and after the month-long production of George Stevens’ 1956 feature film, Giant, which tells the story of three generations of a powerful Texas ranching dynasty. Based on Edna Ferber’s controversial novel, Giant was a different kind of western, one that took an unflinching look at feminism and class divisions and one of the first films to explore the racial divide between Anglos and Mexican Americans in the Southwest.  In this lesson, students will learn about the important role that the diversity of personal and social identities played in the creation and narrative of Giant and the value of telling and viewing stories through an intersectional lens today.

    GIANT: INTERSECTIONALITY EDUCATOR GUIDE AND LESSON PLAN

     

    Grades: 9-13+

Brand: Latino Public Broadcasting