Civil Rights Movement


  • Ruben Salazar: Man in the Middle | Lesson Plan: Objectivity and Bias in Journalism

    "Ruben believed in the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. You and I know that freedom of speech is limited. You can say anything you want as long as you don't step on some bigshot's toes."

    - Phil Montez Friend/U.S. Commission on Civil Rights

     Ruben Salazar: Man in the Middle, is an investigative look at the life and mysterious death of pioneering journalist Ruben Salazar. At the heart of the story is Salazar's transformation from a mainstream, establishment reporter to primary chronicler and supporter of the Chicano movement of the late 1960s. Killed under mysterious circumstances by a law enforcement officer in 1970, Salazar became an instant martyr to Latinos - many of whom had criticized his reporting during his lifetime. Adding to the Salazar mystique is that the details of how he was killed have been obscured in the ensuing four decades since his death.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Ruben Salazar: Man in the Middle | Media Gallery

    Ruben Salazar: Man in the Middle, is an investigative look at the life and mysterious death of pioneering journalist Ruben Salazar. At the heart of the story is Salazar's transformation from a mainstream, establishment reporter to primary chronicler and supporter of the radical Chicano movement of the late 1960s. In this lesson plan, students will learn about the life and journalism of Ruben Salazar; consider the principles of journalistic objectivity and advocacy journalism and the social, economic, and political factors that contribute to journalistic bias; and examine the current state of journalism and the role that objectivity and bias play in reporting.

    MAN IN THE MIDDLE: EDUCATOR GUIDE AND LESSON PLAN

    Grades: 9-13+
  • El Poeta | Lesson Plan | Answering Violence with Non-Violent Action

    "It doesn't matter if we reached the tree and picked the fruit, what matters is having walked toward it."

    - Parayam Desai, Gandhi's disciple

     

    EL POETA tells the heartbreaking and inspiring story of renowned Mexican poet Javier Sicilia, who ignited mass protests and an ongoing international movement after the brutal killing of his 24-year-old son Juan Francisco — collateral damage in a drug war that has left more than 100,000 dead or missing since 2006.

    After his son’s death in 2011, Sicilia called on the Mexican people to protest, bringing more than 100,000 people to the capital demanding that the government address the devastating impact of the militarized drug war. The movement, which embraced the principles of nonviolent action, launched peace caravans throughout Mexico and then crossed the border to the United States, urging American citizens and lawmakers to acknowledge that America’s appetite for drugs (the U.S. makes up 90 percent of the market for Mexican drugs) and loose gun laws have fueled the ongoing war.

    EL POETA transforms the hard news story of drugs, murder and corruption into a deeply personal examination of the impact of the ultimate loss on the human psyche – as well as the power of protest and the courage of conviction to inspire positive change.

    Description adapted from: VOCES PBS and New PBS Documentary 'El Poeta' Screening & Discussion At Logan Heights Library 

      

    Grades: 9-13+
  • El Poeta | Stepping Up: Answering Violence With Non-Violent Action | Media Gallery

    Using excerpts from the VOCES documentary El Poeta, students will learn about Poet Javier Sicilia and the “Movement for Peace with Justice and Dignity”; explore the concept of Nonviolent Action and develop a working definition for the term; and learn about the Six Principles of Nonviolence from The Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change. 

    EL POETA: EDUCATOR GUIDE AND LESSON PLAN

    Grades: 9-12
  • As Long as I Remember | Lesson Plan: Reclaiming Lost Histories

    "I joined the army and I wanted to be all I can be. I guess at that time the government saw us and said 'hey, we can use them in Nam.'

    - Juan Farias, Vietnam Veteran and visual artist  

     

    Throughout the Vietnam War, Latino and Hispanic soldiers were documented as “White” and as a result, their contributions, experiences, and stories have been underrepresented. Although detailed data about Latino service in the Vietnam War is still being compiled, it has been established that Latino soldiers were over-represented in both the enlisted population and combat casualties. For example, Mexican Americans accounted for approximately 20% of the U.S. casualties in the Vietnam War although they made up only 10% of the country’s population at the time.

    Through the intimate interviews with Veterans in in the film, As Long As I Remember: American Veteranos, students will consider the forces that shape our understanding of historic events and eras, understand the factors that motivated such a large percentage of Latino servicemen to enlist in the Vietnam War.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • As Long as I Remember: American Veteranos | Lost Histories: Media Gallery

    AS LONG AS I REMEMBER: AMERICAN VETERANOS examines the steep personal toll and enduring legacy of the Vietnam War on three artists from south Texas: visual artist Juan Farias, author Michael Rodriguez and actor/poet Eduardo Garza. Through the personal histories and experiences of these Chicano veterans, the film reveals the important role art plays in sorting their memories, celebrating their culture, and treating the long-term impact of their military experience including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    Through these film clips and lesson plans, students will consider the forces that shape our understanding of historic events and eras, understand the factors that motivated such a large percentage of Latino servicemen to enlist in the Vietnam War, understand the role of art in recovering from PTSD and explore the personal experiences of Latino Veterans through intimate interviews with Farias, Rodriguez and Garza.

    ALAIR: LOST HISTORIES EDUCATOR GUIDE AND LESSON PLAN

     

    Grades: 9-13+
  • As Long as I Remember: American Veteranos | Lesson Plan: How We Serve

    "You’re grown up on the idea that you’re not good enough. You have to have different qualifications in order to get this American Dream..." 

    - Juan Farias, Vietnam Veteran and visual artist  

     

    Through this lesson and the veteran interviews in AS LONG AS I REMEMBER: AMERICAN VETERANOS, students will gain a better understanding of the specific experiences of Latino/Hispanic soldiers and their struggle to serve their country while honoring their community, culture, and commitment to social justice. Students will also explore the variety of opportunities for individuals and groups to make positive contributions and think about how they can best fulfill their responsibility as engaged members of the American community.

     

     

    Grades: 9-13+
  • As Long as I Remember: American Veteranos | Lesson Plan: Combat PTSD and Art as Therapy

    “With PTSD, you kind of go right back to that point in time and live there for a while. So the writing kind of takes him there, but then it brings him back out.”

    - Linda Rodriguez, wife of Vietnam Veteran and author, Michael Rodriguez

     

    Through this lesson, students will understand what PTSD is and about its prevalence in the general population, especially among combat veterans. They will also discuss how the specific social and political experiences of Latino veterans interviewed in AS LONG AS I REMEMBER: AMERICAN VETERANOS contributed to their experience of PTSD, and the benefit of art-based therapy in Vietnam Veterans lives and the lives of veterans of modern warfare.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • As Long as I Remember: American Veteranos | PTSD and Art as Therapy: Media Gallery

    AS LONG AS I REMEMBER: AMERICAN VETERANOS examines the steep personal toll and enduring legacy of the Vietnam War on three artists from south Texas: visual artist Juan Farias, author Michael Rodriguez and actor/poet Eduardo Garza. Through the personal histories and experiences of these Chicano veterans, the film reveals the important role art plays in sorting their memories, celebrating their culture, and treating the long-term impact of their military experience including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    Through these film clips and lesson plan, students will understand what PTSD is and about its prevalence in the general population, especially among combat veterans. They will also discuss how the specific social and political experiences of Latino veterans interviewed in AS LONG AS I REMEMBER: AMERICAN VETERANOS contributed to their experience of PTSD, and the benefit of art-based therapy in Vietnam Veterans' lives and the lives of veterans of modern warfare.

    AS LONG AS I REMEMBER: PTSD AND ART THERAPY EDUCATOR GUIDE AND LESSON PLAN

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Children of Giant | Lesson Plan: De/Segregation in the Shadow of Giant

    “I think it’s a very important part of history; you cannot deny history. That would be denying who we are and what the United States is.”

    - Olivia Roman, Former Blackwell School student and Marfa resident

     

    In the summer of 1955, Hollywood movie crews rolled into the small, West Texas town of Marfa to film Giant based on Edna Ferber’s best-selling but controversial novel. Like Ferber’s book, director, George Stevens’ film portrayed critical social issues that were rarely addressed in mainstream movies, including racial prejudice, segregation, sexism, and the plight of the working poor.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Children of Giant: Blackwell School | Media Gallery

    Children of Giant unearths the deeply wrought emotions surrounding the de-facto segregation of Anglos and Latinos in the small West Texas town of Marfa, before, during, and after the month-long production of George Stevens’ 1956 feature film, Giant, which tells the story of three generations of a powerful Texas ranching dynasty. Based on Edna Ferber’s controversial novel, Giant was a different kind of western, one that took an unflinching look at feminism and class divisions and one of the first films to explore the racial divide between Anglos and Mexican Americans in the Southwest.  Using excerpts from the documentary Children of Giant, students will learn about the social issues that were prevalent in Marfa, Texas during the making of the film Giant and the lasting impact they had on the community members.

    GIANT: DE/SEGREGATION EDUCATOR GUIDE AND LESSON PLAN

     

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Children of Giant | Lesson Plan: Intersectionality On Screen and Off

    "People went to the theater to see Elizabeth Taylor, and what they got was an unrelenting feminist message and a message for social justice."

    - M. G. Lord, Writer

    In the summer of 1955, Hollywood movie crews rolled into the small, West Texas town of Marfa to film, Giant, based on Edna Ferber’s best-selling but controversial novel. Children of Giant illustrates how Edith Ferber’s personal experience of discrimination, stemming from her intersecting identities as a Jewish woman, and her collaborative research into the lives and experiences of Mexican-Americans and Anglo-Americans in Texas, influenced her development of complex characters such as Juana and Leslie. It also reveals the Intersectionality of discrimination behind the lens through the experiences of the citizens of Marfa as well as the actor Elsa Cardenas, who played Juana.

     

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Children of Giant: Intersectionality | Media Gallery

    Children of Giant unearths the deeply wrought emotions surrounding the de-facto segregation of Anglos and Latinos in the small West Texas town of Marfa, before, during, and after the month-long production of George Stevens’ 1956 feature film, Giant, which tells the story of three generations of a powerful Texas ranching dynasty. Based on Edna Ferber’s controversial novel, Giant was a different kind of western, one that took an unflinching look at feminism and class divisions and one of the first films to explore the racial divide between Anglos and Mexican Americans in the Southwest.  In this lesson, students will learn about the important role that the diversity of personal and social identities played in the creation and narrative of Giant and the value of telling and viewing stories through an intersectional lens today.

    GIANT: INTERSECTIONALITY EDUCATOR GUIDE AND LESSON PLAN

     

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Children of Giant | Lesson Plan: Subverting and Reinforcing Stereotypes

    "They were looking to make me dark and a little bit more Mexican. The way they thought Mexicans were."

    - Elsa Cardenas (actor who portrayed ‘Juana’ in Giant) 

     

    Based on the controversial Edna Ferber novel of the same name, Giant did not shy from the strong social issues experienced throughout post-WWII America—it brought to the screen an unflinching look at racism, early feminism, and class divisions—daring themes for movie audiences at the time. In this lesson, students will learn about the social and cultural tensions in the story and on the production of the film as discussed in the documentary Children of Giant. Through the learning activities, they will examine the ongoing social impact of stereotypes in film and media and analyze how George Stevens and the makers of Giant both reinforced and attempted to subvert common and pernicious stereotypes of race, class, and gender in 1950’s America.

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Children of Giant: Stereotypes | Media Gallery

    Children of Giant unearths the deeply wrought emotions surrounding the de-facto segregation of Anglos and Latinos in the small West Texas town of Marfa, before, during, and after the month-long production of George Stevens’ 1956 feature film, Giant, which tells the story of three generations of a powerful Texas ranching dynasty. Based on Edna Ferber’s controversial novel, Giant was a different kind of western, one that took an unflinching look at feminism and class divisions and one of the first films to explore the racial divide between Anglos and Mexican Americans in the Southwest. In this lesson, students will understand the ongoing social impact of stereotypes in film and media and how George Stevens and the makers of Giant both reinforced and attempted to subvert common and pernicious stereotypes of race, class, and gender in 1950’s America. 

    GIANT: STEREOTYPES EDUCATOR GUIDE AND LESSON PLAN

     

    Grades: 9-13+
  • Unfinished Spaces

    The Cuban Revolution changed over time, particularly for creative professionals like the architects who designed the innovative National Art Schools. What happens when the initial moment of a revolution gives way to an established ideology? This video clip and accompanying lesson plan provide insight into the Cold War Era by exploring the impact of Soviet involvement in an emerging Cuban state.

    Grades: 6-13+

Brand: Latino Public Broadcasting