Seasonal Science

Expand/Collapse Seasonal Science


With every season comes change - from weather, to human behavior, to critter habits - and Seasonal Science helps reveal the science behind it all. Colorful animations guide you through each episode, along with plenty of fun facts to boost your knowledge and wow your peers. Start learning now, and watch Seasonal Science! Presented by UNC-TV in North Carolina.

  • Seasonal Science: Asian Tiger Mosquito

    Has your backyard picnic ever been interrupted by an attack of mosquitoes? Don’t you just hate the itchy, red bumps that follow? But, did you also know these pests can carry viruses that could make you sick? In this video, learn how and why the invasive Asian tiger mosquito is even more problematic than other varieties. 

    Grades: 6-8
  • Seasonal Science: Frostbite

    How are all the structures in your body affected by cold weather and why do our fingers, toes, and nose end up with frostbite first?  When we start getting cold, the tissue and organs in our extremities do not get as much warm blood as our more important internal organs.  Next, ice crystals start to form in our cells causing them to die.  Finally, rewarming the tissue can cause damage resulting in problems with muscles, tendons, and bone.  This video and lesson integrate essential vocabulary for the NC science curriculum.  The explanation of this winter medical issue includes an engaging way to introduce students to human body organization.

    Grades: 6-13+
  • Seasonal Science: Hibernation

    How can mammals survive hibernation?  We may not know as much as we think.  There are several myths about hibernation that are corrected in this seasonal science video.  To survive, mammals lower their metabolism including respiration, heart rate, and temperature in order to conserve energy.  This is a form of maintaining homeostasis.  This video and lesson draws connections between hibernation and homeostasis to integrate essential vocabulary for the NC science curriculum.  The resolution of common hibernation myths creates an engaging way to introduce students to metabolism, respiration, heart rate and homeostasis in humans.

    Grades: 6-13+
  • Seasonal Science: Hurricane

    Why do hurricanes get their own season? The reason for the season is because of the three requirements for a hurricane to form. Precursor storms off the coast of Africa that travel on currents, warm ocean temperatures, and low wind shear due to the location of the jet stream are only available between June and November. Therefore, this is the season for hurricanes. This video and lesson integrate essential vocabulary for the NC science curriculum. The explanation of this extreme storm includes an engaging way to introduce students to the factors that affect our weather like temperature, air pressure, moisture and wind.

    Grades: 6-13+
  • Seasonal Science: Pine Pollen

    Why does everything turn yellow in spring? Because the pine trees produce yellow pollen by the bucketful every year at this time. This annoying ritual is necessary for pine trees to reproduce since pollen holds the male gamete.

    Grades: 6-12
  • Seasonal Science: Raptor Migration

    Why do some birds, like raptors, move from one region to another at certain times of the year?   It is all about their interactions with their environment.  The primary factor is scarcity in a food source.  Another factor includes changes in the weather. This video and lesson integrate essential vocabulary for the NC science curriculum.  The explanation of this seasonal event includes an engaging way to introduce students to the abiotic and biotic factors that affect the raptor’s migration and provides a platform to investigate the types of relationships found in their ecosystem.

    Grades: 6-12
  • Seasonal Science: Thundersnow

    Have you experienced a thundersnow storm?  Most snow storms form when warm air moves into an area in the winter and rising warm air condenses to form snow.  If the warm air rises very quickly, the condensing moisture collides with existing particles in the cloud causing electrically charged areas.  When a cloud has charged areas, lightning can result.  The accompanying sound is why we call these thundersnow storms.  This video and lesson integrate essential vocabulary for the NC science curriculum.  The explanation of this rare winter weather includes an engaging way to introduce students to air masses, fronts, storms, and the water cycle.

    Grades: 6-13+

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