All Subjects
      All Types

        Info

        Grades

        2-5

        Permitted Use

        Stream, Download, Share, and Modify


        21 Favorites
        315 Views

        European Influences on Colonial American Culture

        The cultural and political connections between Europe and the Americas have been strong since the earliest European settlements. This is understandable since it was largely Europeans that colonized both North and South America between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. Until the nineteenth century, the Spanish Empire included territory across South America, Central America, Mexico, the Caribbean, much of what is now the US West, as well as the entire northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico from Florida to Texas. From earliest contact, Spanish explorers, priests, and conquistadors spread European architecture, religion, language, political systems, and even foods across the lands they conquered.

        Likewise, in North America, especially in the areas along the Atlantic coast, the English, Dutch and French settlers brought their languages and traditions with them when they arrived. Over time, the English came to dominate much of North America, but evidence of the Dutch and French participation still remains. The French language is still widely spoken as a first language Quebec Canada. There are many cities across parts of the US that still have their Dutch names: Batavia, NY; Hoboken, NJ; Amsterdam, NY; and many others. The evidence of English influence is obvious across North America in the language people speak, the architecture used, the legal system, and the political system.

         

        Take a look at the images in the Media Gallery to learn more about European influence and culture in the United States.

        State Names

        Many of the names of US states reflect the European languages of the Europeans that conquered or settled there. Florida is a Spanish name that means Уthe flowery;Ф Colorado is a Spanish name that means Уred colorФ from the color of the Colorado River; and both New York and New Jersey are clearly names brought from the British Isles, the town York and Jersey island.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download, Share, and Modify

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        Christianity in the US

        At the founding of the English colonies in North America, Europe was almost entirely Christian. In the southern countries of Italy, Spain, and Portugal, Catholicism was the dominant religion. Further north in Germany, Denmark, the Netherlands, and England, there were many different forms of Protestantism. The English that settled in the colonies of Massachusetts, Connecticut, and others were Protestants. They built protestant churches and wrote laws that were influenced by their Protestantism. Over time, Christianity and religion in general in the United States has become far more diverse. The church shown here is an Episcopalian Church located in Washington DC. The Episcopalian Church is the name used in the US for the Church of England.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download, Share, and Modify

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        You must be logged in to use this feature

        Need an account?
        Register Now