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        Baseball: Across a Divided Society

        The decades between the close of the Civil War and the beginning of World War II were a time of profound social turmoil in the United States. While baseball as a sport was becoming tremendously popular around the still-young nation, Americans experienced the sport in various ways reflecting their social and ethnic backgrounds. This primary source set from the Library of Congress includes documents and images which tell the story of how baseball emerged as the American national pastime. See the Teacher's Guide for historical context and teaching suggestions.

        http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/primarysourcesets/baseball/

        Take Me Out to the Ball Game

        This Library of Congress primary source is the sheet music for the classic baseball tune, "Take Me Out to the Ball Game." The lyricist for this song was Jack Norworth and the composer was Albert Von Tilzer. It was created in 1908.

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        Armando Marsans Baseball Card

        This Library of Congress primary source is a baseball card portrait of Armando Marsans, who played for the Cincinnati Reds. The card says that Marsans was a native of Cuba and he started his baseball career there. He came to the U.S. to play on the New Britain team of the Connecticut league in 1910.

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        Spanish-American Baseball Guide

        This Library of Congress primary source document shows the cover of the Spanish-American edition of "Spalding's Official Baseball Guide" It was published in March 1913 by the American Sports Publishing Company.

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        Chief Meyers, New York, NL & Chief Bender, Philadelphia, AL at World Series

        This Library of Congress primary source photograph shows John T. "Chief" Meyers, from New York of the National League, and Charles Albert "Chief" Bender, from Philadelphia of the American League, at the 1911 World Series. Both players were of Native American descent.

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        The Ball Team Composed Mainly of Glass Workers

        This Library of Congress primary source photograph shows a 1908 baseball team in Indiana composed mainly of glass workers. Lewis Wickes Hines was the photographer.

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        Going to the Baseball Game

        This Library of Congress primary source photograph shows Georgia Caine and the Anshutz sisters going to a baseball game. It was originally part of the George Grantham Bain Collection, which represents the photographic files of one of America's earliest news picture agencies.

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        Waseda University Baseball Team

        This Library of Congress primary source is a photograph of the Waseda University baseball team during a visit to the United States. Waseda University is located in Tokyo, Japan and the team is pictured here in Honolulu, Hawaii.

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        New York Female Giants

        This Library of Congress primary source photograph shows a female batter ducking under a high pitch and a female catcher standing with the baseball in her glove. They are using a rock as home plate. A large group of boys and men stand in the background, watching.

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        Amateur Championship Game

        This Library of Congress photograph depicts an amateur championship game on September 20, 1914 at the Brookside Stadium. The competing teams were Telling's Strollers and Hanna's Cleaners. There were 100,000 spectators in attendance.

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        President Wilson Throwing First Pitch

        This Library of Congress primary source photograph shows President Woodrow Wilson throwing out the first pitch on opening day of professional baseball in 1916.

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        That Arm — Your Country Needs it

        This Library of Congress primary source print is an illustration showing a soldier pitching a baseball. It is a World War I recruitment poster.

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        Scoreboard for Baseball Game

        This Library of Congress primary source photograph shows the scoreboard for a baseball game at the annual field day of the FSA (Farm Security Administration) farmworkers community, in Yuma, Arizona in 1942.

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        Manzanar Boys Starting a Baseball Game

        This Library of Congress primary source photograph shows a group of boys starting a ball game soon after their arrival at Manzanar, California in April 1942. This was a War Relocation Authority center for the evacuees of Japanese ancestry from certain West Coast areas.

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        African-American and Caucasian Teammates

        This Library of Congress primary source photograph shows a baseball team composed of African-American and Caucasian Marines. Breaking a tradition of 167 years, the U.S. Marine Corps started enlisting African-Americans on June 1, 1942. The first class of 1,200 African-American volunteers began their training three months later as members of the 51st Composite Defense Battalion at Montford Point, a section of the 200 square mile Marine Base, Camp Lejeune, at New River, North Carolina. Evidence of the lack of racial friction may be seen in the sports program at the camp. On the baseball team, African-American enlistees and White non-com officers are teammates.

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        Mt. View Little League Team

        This Library of Congress primary source is a contemporary photograph showing members of the Mt. View Little League team on opening day of Little League season in Packsville, West Virginia in 2000. Hundreds of community members gather at the ball field at the annual opening day of Little League each year. Three ball fields have been at the mouth of Little Marsh Fork since the 1940s. Historically, each coal company sponsored its own team, and coal towns competed against each other.

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        Marine Baseball Club

        This Library of Congress primary source photograph shows the U.S.S. Maine baseball team including pitcher William Lambert (back row, far right) and John H. Bloomer (back row, far left). All of the team members except for John Bloomer were killed in the explosion of the Maine on February 15, 1898.

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