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        Equality

        In the wake of the Civil War, three amendments were added to the U.S. Constitution. The Thirteenth Amendment abolished slavery, the Fourteenth Amendment made freed slaves citizens of the United States and the state wherein they lived, and the Fifteenth Amendment gave the vote to men of any race. During this time, the nation struggled with what role four million newly freed slaves would assume in American life. With the triumph of the Radical Republicans in Congress, the Constitution was amended to grant full citizenship to former slaves and promise them equal treatment under the law, a promise that took more than a century to fulfill.

        http://www.pbs.org/tpt/constitution-usa-peter-sagal/home/

        Same Sex Marriage

        Lawyers Ted Olson & David Boies explain why they're arguing for the right for same-sex couples to marry. They say the 14th amendment's equal protection clause awards equal rights for all citizens, regardless of sexual preference.

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        Liberty and Equality

        What exactly does "liberty" mean? What does "equality" mean? Columbia law Professor Jamal Greene talks about why we've had so many legal battles about those few words in the 14th amendment.

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        The 14th Amendment

        Yale Professor Akhil Amar tells us how important the 14th amendment is to us today - and gives us a little history behind its creation.

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        The Supreme Court

        Stanford Professor Robert George believes there is no constitutional mandate that would allow same-sex marriage to be legalized. He also shares his belief that the Supreme Court should not decide controversial issues that are not explicitly outlined in the Constitution. Instead, he thinks that should be left up to legislators or to the popular vote.

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        Equal Treatment

        Lawyer Michelle Alexander explains why she believes the 14th amendment is not being followed — particularly when it comes to former inmates, and their right to vote.

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