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        Contains Violence

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        Twelve Disciples of Nelson Mandela: The Battle to End Apartheid

        This lesson plan is for use with the film Twelve Disciples of Nelson Mandela. This 73-minute film features the lives of 12 black South African exiles who left their home in 1960 to pursue educational opportunities, to tell the world about the brutality of the apartheid system and to raise support for the fledgling African National Congress (ANC) and its leader Nelson Mandela. While the film is partly a personal journey by the stepson of one of the "disciples," it also documents the history of one of modern Africa's most significant political movements.

        http://www.pbs.org/pov/twelvedisciples/lesson_plan.php

        Twelve Disciples of Nelson Mandela: Living Under Apartheid (Clip 1 of 2)

        In the first clip associated with the Twelve Disciples of Nelson Mandela lesson plan, a man named Percy recalls what it was like to live under apartheid in the South African city of Bloemfontein. Students should discuss how they might have felt living in the conditions shown in the film. Discuss their reactions and find out if students would have done anything to resist such treatment.

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        Twelve Disciples of Nelson Mandela: Non-violent Protest Against Apartheid (Clip 2 of 2)

        The second clip associated with the Twelve Disciples of Nelson Mandela lesson plan shows the re-enactment of an African National Congress-organized non-violent protest against apartheid and the South African government that occurred in 1952. Tell students that the South African government responded to every attempt to oppose the system of apartheid with increased repression and violence, therefore resistance movements decided to take up arms in the struggle. Students should individually identify a national, state or local problem that they could try to change.

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