All Subjects
      All Types

        Info

        Grades

        6-12

        Permitted Use

        Stream, Download, Share, and Modify


        Part of PBS LearningMedia
        1 Favorites
        97 Views

        The Effect of Western Influence in China

        By the mid-1700s, trade between the West and China had been occurring for centuries. For most of that time period, China had been the more powerful partner in this trading relationship. But as European powers began to grow in strength, this relationship changed. By the end of the 1700s, the Western powers were becoming more aggressive in their dealings with China, as demand for valuable Chinese silks and other goods grew. Britain sent ambassadors to the country to negotiate trade deals more favorable to British merchants. The Chinese, still believing they were strong enough to resist, largely ignored these attempts. In response, the British flooded the Chinese market with opium from south Asia, which greatly disrupted life in China where many became addicted. Things came to a head late in the 1800s as China suffered internal civil war and eventually a violent anti-foreign rebellion known as the Boxer Rebellion. As European powers moved in to put down the rebellion, the power of the Chinese ruling dynasty declined. By 1912, the dynasty had collapsed and the Republic of China was formed.

        The editorial cartoons in this gallery demonstrate how Europeans understood their relationship with China during this time. Review 

        The Chinese Cake, 1898

        In this French political cartoon, the world leaders are dividing up a cake that represents China. The countries of England, Germany, France, Russia, and Japan are represented by the figures doing the cutting. The Chinese figure stands helplessly in the background.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download, Share, and Modify

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        Missionaries in China

        Missionaries from America and England preach to a Chinese man. Both missionaries have bags of money. Soldiers and cannons are on either side of the missionaries. The English guns are named "Good Samaritan" and "Revivalist", and the American guns are named "Psalm-Singer", "Sermonizer", and "Deacon". The caption below this cartoon reads: “According to the ideas of our missionary maniacs, the Chinaman must be converted, even if it takes the whole military and naval forces of the two greatest nations of the world to do it.”

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download, Share, and Modify

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        Chinese Boxers Destroying Railroad Tracks, between Peking (Beijing) and Hong Kong, 1900

        The Boxer Rebellion grew from unrest in China due to Western influences. In order to preserve their way of life, including government system and religion, a group of rebels called the Boxers, staged a rebellion in 1899.The front page of this French magazine shows the Boxers dismantling railroad tracks between Hong Kong (a major trading port with the West) and Beijing, the Chinese imperial capital.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download, Share, and Modify

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        Excerpts from the Journal of George Macarney and Chinese Statesmen Wei Yuan

        These two excerpts show different perspectives of the process of European imperialism in China. The first is an excerpt from the journal of George Macartney (1737 – 1806), a British statesman and diplomat who led an embassy to China tasked with establishing a more favorable trading relationship with China. In the excerpt he discusses using force to achieve the trading goals Britain wants. The second excerpt is from Edward Harper Parker’s translation and adaptation of some writings of Chinese statesmen Wei Yuan. In the excerpt Wei Yuan discusses the Opium Wars from a Chinese perspective.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download, Share, and Modify

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        Chinese Soldiers Capture the British Ship Arrow, October 1856

        Trade disputes and difficult relations between the Chinese and English led to the Opium Wars, or Anglo-Chinese Wars. Here the Chinese capture the British ship “Arrow” and take the crew prisoner on October 8, 1856. The Chinese can be seen taking down the British flag. English School, (19th century).

        Permitted Use:

        Stream and Download

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        You must be logged in to use this feature

        Need an account?
        Register Now