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        9-13+

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        Part of Slavery by Another Name
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        Whose Constitutional Rights?

        This Slavery by Another Name unit focuses on the Reconstruction Amendments and acts enacted after the Civil War to extend rights to blacks, but also examines how these advances were undermined. Students will critically analyze the Thirteenth Amendment and learn how a key loophole within it was exploited for the use of forced labor after the Civil War. Students will also be able to examine the Fourteenth and Fifteenth amendments and the Civil Rights Act of 1875 and consider how subsequent decisions by the Supreme Court regarding rights for blacks were in direct conflict.

        http://www.pbs.org/tpt/slavery-by-another-name/

        The Thirteenth Amendment Didn't Abolish Slavery?

        This Slavery by Another name video clip explains why, without enforceable legislation, the 13th Amendment did not truly abolish slavery in the U.S. The clip examines the purpose and limitations of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

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        Slavery by Another Name Clip

        This video clip from Slavery by Another Name summarizes the history of forced labor that occurred for eighty years after the Civil War. The clip provides an overview of the entire program.

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        Presidential Reconstruction

        In this Slavery by Another Name video clip, Historian Khalil Muhammad explains the Reconstruction under President Johnson. The clip explains the purpose behind the federal government’s decision to enact Reconstruction policies.

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        What are the Reconstruction Amendments?

        This Slavery by Another Name video clip explains the Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth amendments, also known as the Reconstruction Amendments. During Reconstruction, these three amendments to the Constitution were made in an effort to establish equality for black Americans. The Thirteenth Amendment, adopted in 1865, abolishes slavery or involuntary servitude except in punishment for a crime. The Fourteenth Amendment, adopted in 1868, defines all people born in the United States as citizens, requires due process of law, and requires equal protection to all people. The Fifteenth Amendment, ratified in 1870, prevents the denial of a citizen’s vote based on race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

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        1883

        In this excerpt from the book Slavery by Another Name, author Douglas A. Blackmon writes about the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in the Civil Rights Cases (a consolidation of five similar cases) of 1883 to only enforce the Civil Rights Act of 1875 under rare circumstances, effectively making civil rights a local, not federal, issue. Congress didn’t pass similar legislation until 1957.

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