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        The Great Depression, the Family Farm and the New Deal

        Learn about how family farmers and agricultural workers were impacted by the Great Depression and the New Deal in this video from Iowa Public Television. 

        Although the Great Depression began in 1929, hard times had started about ten years earlier for many rural farmers. The Farm Security Administration (FSA) was created in 1933 to come to the aid of agricultural workers and family farmers.

        For most people in the United States, the start of the Great Depression was October 29, 1929. On that day, the value of stocks traded in the New York Stock Exchange dropped dramatically. Banks and investment companies that had put money in stocks lost fortunes. Factories began to close, laying off workers. Hard times were coming. However, hard times had started about ten years earlier for farmers in the Midwest.

        In 1933, as part of the New Deal, President Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration undertook the most far-reaching land reform and planning program in modern American history. One of the new agencies was the FSA, the Farm Security Administration. The FSA's goal was to come to the aid of agricultural workers and family farmers.

        This segment from Iowa Public Television's documentary "The People in the Pictures: Stories from the Wettach Farm Photos" features original photography and first-person accounts of farm life in rural America during the Great Depression and early twentieth century. 

        Contributor: Iowa Public Television
        Funder: Iowa Communications Network

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