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        6-12

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        Ensembles (Part 2)

        Students will come away with a deeper understanding of how Barnes approached looking at art, and in his words “How to Judge a Painting.” Students will be introduced to Barnes’ concept of “The Ensemble” – gaining a better idea of how Barnes approached grouping art works together, how he constructed the wall hanging arrangements in the galleries, and the introduction of furniture and ironworks into the ensemble.   Students will be exposed to the concepts of symmetry, balance and rhythm in the gallery. 

        Sampler, Bast, silk, and cotton

        Dr. Barnes used this needlework sampler as part of an art gallery. Think about whether you would include objects in a gallery that weren't created to be works of art.

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        Highlighted Paintings: Children on the Seashore, Guernsey and Picnic

        Compare and contrast the two landscapes highlighted in this photograph. Both paintings are by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, but have different settings and different styles.

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        Picnic (Le Déjeuner sur l'herbe), Pierre-Auguste Renoir

        Look closely at the style of painting in this scene, and what types of lines, shapes and colors the artist uses to depict a picnic. Contrast these elements to those in the previous painting.

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        Highlighted Objects: Candlestand, Sewing Stand, Coffeepots, Samplers, and Vise

        These tables and coffeepots aren't just decoration. Barnes positioned them here to point viewers' eyes toward the paintings on the wall. Consider how the placement of the artwork affects what piece of art you look at first.

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        Candlestand

        Compare the shape of this small table to the shape of the table on the other end of the wall.

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        Sewing Stand

        Compare the shape of this small table to the shape of the table on the other end of the wall.

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        Coffeepot

        Dr. Barnes used this coffeepot not for coffee but to point viewers' eyes toward the other artworks on this wall. Think about other objects that have beautiful or interesting forms that don't relate to their original use.

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        Coffeepot, Willoughby Shade

        Dr. Barnes used this coffeepot not for coffee but to point viewers' eyes toward the other artworks on this wall. Think about other objects that have beautiful or interesting forms that don't relate to their original use.

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        Sampler, Bast, wool, and sillk

        Dr. Barnes put this needlework sampler in an art gallery. Think about whether that was its original purpose.

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        Vise

        Most of the artworks on this wall are arranged symmetrically, but this vise is only on one of the tables on one side of the room. Consider why Dr. Barnes might have included this small vise in the gallery, even though it disrupts the symmetry of the wall.

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        Highlighted Objects: Queen Anne Side Chair, Hinge, and Lock

        Look for relationships between the highlighted chairs and ironworks in this image.

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        Queen Anne Side Chair

        Dr. Barnes included this chair in the gallery as a piece of art. Examine the shape of the chair's back and legs.

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        Hinge

        Dr. Barnes also considered ironworks such as this to be works of art. Examine the shape of this hinge, and compare it to the shape of the chair.

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        Lock

        Dr. Barnes combined this lock with the hinge to create a larger ironwork. Look for shapes in this piece that look like the shapes in the hinge and the chair.

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        How to Judge a Painting

        Hear an excerpt from Dr. Barnes' article about why he enjoys collecting and looking at art. Learn about the “pleasures” of studying art.

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