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        Space Junk: Fast Trash | Stem in 30

        We think of outer space as pretty empty, but that's not the case around planet Earth. There are millions of pieces of man-made debris floating around. This debris causes potential problems for astronauts, satellites, and other important pieces of equipment circling Earth. This fast-paced webcast will look at what's out there and how NASA keeps an eye on it, visit the full archived lesson with pictures and audience comments here.

        Originally presented on March 18, 2015 | Explore the Support Materials below for the archived live-stream content with questions, comments, and images shared during the live event.

        Space Junk: Fast Trash

        We think of outer space as pretty empty, but that's not the case around planet Earth. There are millions of pieces of man-made debris floating around.

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        Spacesuit Experiment Demo

        Mrs. Dawson's sixth grade class in Washington, DC, builds and tests spacesuits for their "taternaut" astronauts. The students learn about what materials are used for real spacesuits to protect astronauts from debris impacts in space.

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        What is Space Junk?

        What objects are actually out there in space? Learn about satellites and the "space junk" that floats around in low orbit.

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        Space Junk Animation

        Where does space junk come from and why can it be so hazardous? Even though the junk is often tiny, like the size of a pin or screw, these objects still pose big threats to orbiting satellites.

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