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        Abraham Lincoln | Ken Burns: The Civil War

        Explore a gallery of images about Abraham Lincoln, his wife Mary Todd, and his assassination. Abraham Lincoln was the 16th President of the United States, the first president from the Republican Party, and the leader of the country during the American Civil War. Lincoln’s firm anti-slavery position led to his Emancipation Proclamation, which declared that slaves living in southern, rebel states were free. His oratorical and writing skills, and firm belief in preserving the future of the Union of the United States, appealed to the best of American ideals. Lincoln served as president from 1861-1865. He was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth in Ford’s Theatre in Washington DC on April 14, 1865. 

        Lincoln-Hamlin Campaign Poster, 1860 | Ken Burns: The Civil War

        "The Union must and shall be preserved." For President: Abraham Lincoln of Illinois. For Vice President: Hannibal Hamlin of Maine. Lithograph by W.H. Rease, Philadelphia, ca. 1860. Source: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division.

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        Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln, 1861 | Ken Burns: The Civil War

        Abraham Lincoln delivers his first inaugural address on the East Portico of the Capitol, which was still under construction, March 4, 1861. Source: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division.

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        Allan Pinkerton, President Lincoln, and Maj. Gen. John A. McClernand, 1862 | Ken Burns: The Civil War

        Allan Pinkerton, head of the Union Intelligence Service (the forerunner of the U.S. Secret Service), with President Abraham Lincoln and Gen. John A. McClernand, Antietam, Virginia, October 3, 1862. Photo credit: Alexander Gardner (1821-1882). Source: Library of Congress, Prints & Photo. Division.

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        Mary Todd Lincoln | Ken Burns: The Civil War

        Portrait of Mary Todd Lincoln, ca. 1863. President and Mrs. Lincoln's beloved son William ("Willie") died of typhoid fever on February 20, 1862. This photograph was taken sometime after that date, as Mrs. Lincoln is wearing mourning attire. Source: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division.

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        The "Lincoln Gun" | Ken Burns: The Civil War

        Photograph of a "Lincoln Gun," a 15-inch Rodman Columbiad, at Fort Monroe, Virginia, 1864. The Lincoln Guns were used by the Federal Navy and seaborne expeditions against the Atlantic Coast of the Confederacy. Source: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division.

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        Last Photo of Lincoln from Life, 1865 | Ken Burns: The Civil War

        Head-and-shoulders portrait of Abraham Lincoln, taken on Feb. 5, 1865, and traditionally called the "last photograph of Lincoln from life." Photo credit: Alexander Gardner (1821-1882). Source: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division.

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        John Wilkes Booth Seated, with Cane in Hand | Ken Burns: The Civil War

        Portrait of John Wilkes Booth, accomplished actor, Southern sympathizer, and future assassin of President Lincoln, taken December 3, 1862. Photo credit: Silsbee, Case & Co., Boston, Massachusetts. Source: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division.

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        Execution of the Lincoln Conspirators, July 7, 1865 | Ken Burns: The Civil War

        Mary Surratt, Lewis Powell, David Herold, and George Atzerodt; with officers and others on the scaffold, and guards on the wall. Washington Arsenal Penitentiary (now Ft. McNair), July 7, 1865. Photo: Alex. Gardner (1821-1882). Source: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division.

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