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        Cave People of the Himalaya

        National Geographic Television’s Cave People of the Himalaya features American archaeologist Dr. Mark Aldenderfer’s expedition to explore burial sites of the Upper Mustang region of Nepal. Human remains and artifacts found in these cave tombs provide new insights into the lives and practices of peoples who inhabited this area thousands of years ago. The expedition team includes Dr. Jacqueline Eng, a bioarchaeologist, and seven-time Everest climber Pete Athans, who brings technical climbing skills to the journey.

        http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/cave-people-himalaya/?ar_a=1

        Analyzing Himalayan Mummies

        This National Geographic video segment is about scientists re-curating scientific finds, including mummies, 20 years after they were discovered. Technology has changed, and now, rather than testing for DNA in the marrow of leg bones, scientists tend to search for DNA using teeth. Archaeologist Dr. Mark Aldenderfer uses carbon dating to determine that the burials spanned over 450 years. This indicates these people adapted well to the "high and dry" climate of Nepal's Upper Mustang region, and thrived there for a long time.

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        Clue to a People's Origins

        This National Geographic video segment focuses on strontium analysis of teeth and what it can tell us about an individual. Strontium is an element that occurs naturally in the earth and is absorbed into the bodies of infants through water and mother's milk. Today, scientists can determine exact strontium levels of almost any place on Earth. In this video, scientists discover strontium samples in male mummies' teeth, indicating that they were born locally. However, based on similar evidence, many of the females were born elsewhere. Therefore, the speculation can be made that the females came to the highlands to trade, married the men, and settled there.

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        Rhi Rhi Cave Burial Site

        This National Geographic video segment examines how a scientific team investigates a remote, nearly inaccessible mortuary cave, documents its findings, determines a date for the artifacts, and sketches out a burial site—all without doing any actual excavating. The team discovers a large burial hole in a cave that was once used to bury multiple corpses on top of each other, with layers of stones in between.

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        Bioarchaeology

        In this National Geographic video, a team of archaeologists uncover the bones of two adults and one adolescent. Jackie, an archaeologist, explains that these skeletons are "recording the history" of this culture by preserving information about diseases people had, the food they ate, and fractures they endured. These markers serve as clues to how these ancient people adapted to their environment.

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        Uncovering a Cultural Mystery

        This National Geographic video segment is a true vérité scene, where the camera candidly records a rare moment of discovery: bioarchaeologist Dr. Jackie Eng and archaeologist Dr. Mark Aldenderfer discover cut marks on the bones of the early Samdzong people of Upper Mustang, Nepal. The marks indicate that this culture may have participated in secondary burial ritual practices, which could involve altering corpses. A photographer speculates that these people "de-fleshed" their dead, but the team does not have enough evidence to say for certain.

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