All Subjects
      All Types

        Info

        Grades

        K-2

        Permitted Use


        Part of WGBH
        5 Favorites
        218 Views

        What Is Weather?

        Learn how weather is the combination of four factors—temperature, wind, precipitation, and sunlight and clouds—that occur at a given place and time in this lesson plan from WGBH. The mix of factors is changing all the time; therefore, weather conditions are changing all the time. Students can observe the four factors in various types of weather and identify evidence of weather factors in different weather conditions. 

        English Learner (EL) supports are included in the Support Materials below. These are designed to support vocabulary development and engagement in learning tasks and can be used along with this lesson plan. This resource was developed through WGBH’s Bringing the Universe to America’s Classrooms project, in collaboration with NASA. Click here for the full collection of resources.

        Lesson Summary

        Overview

        Children have been experiencing weather their entire lives—whether playing in the snow, chasing leaves in the wind, jumping in rain puddles, or bundling up against the cold. Exploring weather with children and building on their prior experiences helps them understand the different kinds of weather phenomena they experience every day.

        Weather is an important part of our lives on Earth. People often look outside to see what the weather is before they begin their day. Observing weather can give us clues that help us dress for the day, plan activities, or prepare for a storm. In this media-rich lesson plan, children will observe, identify, and describe different types of local weather. They will investigate the four factors that describe weather—state of sky, temperature, wind, and precipitation—as they engage with interactive media and hands-on activities.

        Grade Level: K–2

        Standard: ESS2.D: Weather and Climate

        • Weather is the combination of sunlight, wind, snow or rain, and temperature in a specific region at a particular time. (K-ESS2-1)

        Science Practices: Ask questions; Construct explanations; Obtain information; Communicate information  

        Big Question: What is weather?

        Time Allotment

        One 40-minute class period (includes a 20-minute outdoor exploration)

        Two 20-minute class periods (interactive)

        Learning Objectives

        • Children can identify and describe the factors of various types of weather (sunny, cloudy, rainy, snowy, warm, cold, windy) using key vocabulary.
        • Children can compare the factors of different types of weather and identify similarities and differences.
        • Children can collect and organize data on various types of weather.

        Prep for Teachers

        Before the Lesson

        • Preview the media assets.
        • Work through the A Look at Weather Factors interactive lesson so you can gain familiarity with the content and anticipate children’s questions.
        • If children are using individual devices, make sure the interactive lesson is loaded and opened to full screen on each device.
        • Print out handouts you will use for the lesson. If printing in black and white, some of the evidence of weather in the images, such as cloud color and precipitation, may not be as clear as in the image on screen. Be sure to have children identify the evidence of factors on the screen before marking on their copies. 
        • Preview the key vocabulary list handout.
          • Use the Weather Key Vocabulary list to familiarize yourself with key terms in the lesson.
          • During the lesson, give children opportunities to explore and talk about different types of weather using their own words. Work in key vocabulary organically throughout the discussions. For example, instead of asking, Who knows what the word temperature means?, you might use the terms hot and cold until you find an opportunity to introduce the term. For example, you could say: It was so hot today, I wonder what the temperature will be tomorrow. 
        • Start children thinking about weather a few days leading up to the lesson. You can say:
          • (at recess) Brrr, I’m cold. I should have worn my jacket.
          • (in the bus line) I wonder why the sky looks so gray now.
          • (during transition) Wow, I wonder why the leaves are all blowing around outside.
        • Create and display a classroom chart titled “Ideas About Weather.” Add the new ideas that children discover as you work through the lesson.
        • Set up a Weather Dress Up station in your room with various items of clothing worn in different types of weather. Display images of and books about various local weather conditions. Children can explore dressing up for different kinds of weather. See the Weather Extension Activities handout for an activity to get children started in the Weather Dress Up Station.

        Optional 

        • Display images of different types of weather around the classroom. Designate an area for local weather images (look online or in local newspapers) to help children begin to recognize different types of weather in their area.
        • Set up a “Weather Book Box” for children to look through on their own or with a partner. Include fiction and nonfiction weather books. (See the Weather Book Ideas handout for suggested titles.)
        • You may want to have the PEEP and the Big Wide World: Stormy Weather video available for small groups to view at designated times throughout the lesson.

        Supplies

        Materials

        • Chart paper
        • Paper
        • Clipboard
        • Technology devices (e.g., computers, tablets, projector)
        • Items for the Weather Dress Up station
        • Writing utensils

        Handouts

        Media Resources

        Introductory Activity

        This lesson plan consists of three parts:

        • Part 1: “A Look at Weather” includes an outdoor exploration.
        • Part 2: “A Look at Weather Factors” is a digital interactive lesson.
        • Part 3: “A Closer Look at Weather Factors” is a continuation of the digital interactive lesson.

        Instructions for leading each part are explained below.

        Learning Activities

        Part 1: A Look at Weather

        (One 40-minute class period including a 20-minute outdoor exploration)

        Children will explore and identify evidence of different types of local weather. Then they will gather evidence from their own experience and from videos and use what they learn to expand on their descriptions of different types of weather. 

        Engage

        Generate interest in weather and activate children’s prior knowledge by beginning the lesson with a weather investigation held outdoors (or from the classroom window). 

        • Consider timing the weather activity for when children arrive at school or after recess, when they already have their outdoor clothes on. 
        • Bring a sheet of paper and a clipboard outside so you can record weather-related ideas that surface during the discussion. 

        Before heading outside, ask children the following questions. Record their responses so you can revisit them as they come up in the learning.

        • What do you think weather is?
        • Why do you think weather is important?
        • What do you want to learn about weather? What questions do you have about weather? 

        Note: Children may not be familiar with the term factor that is used throughout this lesson. Factor is not a technical term in this case but is used throughout the lesson in the context of describing components of weather. You may want to work the term into your discussions organically from the beginning of the lesson so it becomes familiar to children and a term they go to on their own. For example, when children begin to describe weather, it is likely they will use weather factors to do so—such as hot or cold, cloudy or sunny, rain or snow, or wind. You can respond to their observations by saying: You’re right, a strong wind is one of the factors that tell us about the weather today. When you feel children are grasping meaning, you can then say: Scientists use different factors to describe weather just like you are doing!

        Then take children outside (or gather at the window). Ask them to describe the weather. Encourage them to think beyond expected descriptions of weather, such as “It’s hot” or “It’s raining.” Prompt them to engage in richer descriptions of weather factors with questions such as:

        • I wonder why the grass feels wet today? Was it wet yesterday?
        • Look at [classmate’s name]’s hair blowing around. I wonder why his/her hair is moving?
        • What does the sky look like today? Did it look the same yesterday?
        • Why did you wear a jacket to school today?
        • What is making that sound on the window? In the tree?
        • How does the air smell today? Does it smell different sometimes? Why do you think that is? 

        After 10 to 15 minutes, bring children inside and gather together as a whole group. Read aloud a few of the weather ideas you recorded outside as you transfer them to the “Ideas About Weather” chart. Then, give children an opportunity to deepen their discussion from earlier by revisiting the questions:

        • What do you think weather is?
        • Why do you think weather is important?

        Note: As you go through the lesson, you may want to make notes to address any unanswered questions in extension activities following the lesson.

        Explore

        Before you begin, you may want to: 

        • Introduce the “Ideas About Weather” chart. Explain that there are lots of different types of weather. Ask volunteers to name a few. Then explain that there are four factors that we use to talk about different types of weather—sunlight and clouds, temperature, wind, and precipitation. Emphasize that each factor gives us clues about weather. Then say: We will talk a lot about these factors as we learn about weather and add any new ideas we have on the chart. Tell children that the chart will help keep track of all the new ideas they learn about weather.
        • Encourage children to share their ideas about different types of weather before and after viewing each video to help them deepen their learning. 

        Begin the discussion by introducing the video PEEP and the Big Wide World: Stormy Weather. Explain to children that PEEP and The Big Wide World is a show about three very curious friends who like to explore the big wide world together—Peep is a chicken, Chirp is a robin, and Quack is a duck. Tell children that today they will watch the three friends in a video called Stormy Weather. Say: In the video, Peep, Chirp, and Quack experience different types of weather. 

        • Have children share what they know about rainstorms. Then ask: Have you ever been outside in a storm? Can you tell us about it? What did you see and hear? What did you feel or smell? Did you run inside? 
        • You might want to share an experience you had in a storm, too.  
        • Safety Talk Idea: If children talk about thunder and lightning, expand the discussion to include mention of the danger of being out in a storm and how important it is to go inside until the thunder and lightning stop. 

        As children watch the video, encourage them to identify observations that help them describe the weather. You might say: You can look for weather clues in the sky, on the ground, or in the characters. You might even hear clues that tell about the weather. 

        • Play the video. 

        Explain

        After viewing, ask questions to prompt children to identify observations that help them describe different weather they observed in the video. For example:

        • What clues did you observe when it was raining?
        • How does the weather change throughout the day?
        • How does the weather affect the characters?
        • How are the two types of weather different? How are they the same? 
        • Have you ever had to change your plans because of the weather? Explain.  

        Safety Tip: Ask children why they think Peep and his friends ran into the can when they heard thunder and saw a lightning flash. Explain that thunder and lightning storms can be dangerous. You might say: Playing in a rainstorm can be fun, and watching and listening to a thunder and lightning storm can be exciting—but be sure you watch it from a safe place. Thunderstorms make lightning flashes that can be very dangerous, so when you hear a loud KABOOM, it’s time to go inside!

        Turn the sound off as you play a short section of the video (0:53–1:55). Tell children to use only their eyes to find clues about the weather. Ask them to describe what clues showed the weather was changing. Then ask: How was the weather at the beginning of the video clip different than the weather at the end? 

        TIP: If time allows, you may want to end Part 1 of the lesson by having children observe and describe evidence found in real-life rainstorms. You can view real rainstorms in the Different Types of Weather video [00:00-00:31] from Part 3 of the Weather Lesson. 

        Part 2: A Look at Weather Factors

        (20-minute class period)

        Children will identify observations that help them describe different types of weather (snow/rain, hot/cold, windy/calm, sunny/cloudy). They will collect evidence on each type of weather and compare across different types of weather.

        Handouts are needed if children are not working on individual devices: 

        Before Using the Interactive Lesson

        If children are not familiar with using the [computer or tablet], you may want to have them practice before beginning the lesson. For example, you can demonstrate using a mouse, clicking to the next page, and returning to the previous page. This will ensure the science learning time is not spent explaining the technology.

        Note: Throughout the lesson, children will be asked to find clues that indicate different types of weather. As the lesson develops, you might want to introduce the word evidence into the discussion. Say: Scientists have a word they use instead of clues when they are investigating. Scientists look for evidence to tell about the different types of weather they are observing. 

        Engage

        Encourage children to review what they know about the four factors that we use to describe different types of weather (sunlight and clouds, temperature, wind, and precipitation). Prompt them to identify observations that show evidence of these factors in their responses. You can ask questions such as:

        • When you woke up this morning and looked out the window, did you see any clues that helped you know about the weather?
        • Can you find clues in the classroom or outside that tells what the weather is outside (such as boots, mittens, sun)? Were the same clues here yesterday? Why do you think that is?
        • How did the Peep, Chirp, and Quack know a storm was coming in the video PEEP and the Big Wide World Stormy Weather.
        • What evidence did you observe that told you about the weather in the beginning of the video? In the middle?

        A Look at Weather Factors

        If children will work on their own devices while you lead the class on a projector or other central screen, follow these instructions:

        • If you have not had time to introduce children to the technology, model how to navigate through the interactive lesson before beginning. If possible, plan to have an assistant or older student available to help children as they work through the lesson.
        • Project page 1 of the interactive lesson on the screen or wall. If children are using individual devices, be sure they have page 1 open on their screen. Tell children they will be working on the [computer or tablet] as they continue to learn about weather. Explain that the whole class will work together on each page. Say: I will have each page projected on the [screen or wall], and you will click through the pages and follow along with me on your [computer or tablet].

        If you’re leading the class on a projector or other central screen and students do not have their own devices, follow these instructions:

        • Have the Dress for the Weather and PEEP and the Big Wide World: Weather Factor Clues handouts ready to distribute to children.
        • Project page 1 of the interactive lesson on the screen or wall. Explain to children that they will work with you on the interactive lesson. Say: We will work together on each page as we learn more about weather. Tell them that for some of the activities, you will hand out worksheets for them to work on at their desks. 

        Page 1: Weather 

        Have children look at the image. Ask questions such as: 

        • Can you describe the weather in the picture? What do you observe?
        • How do you think the weather will change the boy’s plans?
        • How might knowing about the weather help the boy prepare for going outside? 
        • Have you ever had to change your plans because of the weather?

        Explore

        Page 2: What Is Weather? 

        TIP: As children are introduced to new weather phenomena, consider using the images on display around the classroom to help them associate the phenomena with the visual clues. Record their ideas on the “Ideas About Weather” chart as you go through the lesson.

        Tell children they are going to look for clues (evidence) that tell about different types of weather. Have them focus on one type of weather at a time and identify observations that show evidence of weather. 

        • Read the screen text aloud. Have children look out the window. Ask: What is the weather in outside today? Was it the same yesterday? What was the same or different?
        • Click anywhere on the images to enlarge the set of four images, then project it on a screen or wall. Point out the image of the rainy day. Ask children to pretend they are outside walking in the rain. Then encourage them to use their prior knowledge of rain to describe what they are experiencing. 
        • You may need to prompt children by asking what the sky looks like, what they feel, what they hear, or what they are wearing as they experience the rain. 
        • Repeat with the snow, sky and clouds, and wind images. 

        Page 3: Wind Moves 

        The PEEP and the TOO Windy Day video focuses on wind. The additional factors of weather—temperature, snow or rain, and sunlight and clouds in the sky—are woven into the storyline to help reinforce children’s understanding of factors across all weather phenomena.

        • Read the first line of the screen text aloud. Allow volunteers to describe their experiences with wind. 
        • Read the remaining text. Have volunteers name things they have seen move in the wind.

        Then tell children they are going to watch four short PEEP and the Big Wide World video clips. Explain that each video clip is about a factor of different types of weather. Tell them that the first one is about wind.

        • Encourage children to find clues in the video that tell about wind. You may need to remind them where to look for clues, such as the sky, moving items, character’s feathers rustling, etc. 
        • Play the video through once without pausing.

        After the first viewing, have children complete the Visualize It: Windy Day Clues to deepen their understanding of the weather phenomenon of wind. Explain to children that before they watch the video a second time, they are going to record clues they found by circling them on an image from the PEEP and the TOO Windy Day video. 

        • Have children look at the [bottom] of the screen. Say: Click on the purple Visualize It button. (Or distribute the “Windy Day Clues” handout to children.) Work with children as needed. 
        • Model for children how to choose and click on a color from the color menu at the top of the page. Then demonstrate how to use the pencil tool to draw a circle on the image. Have them make a mark to show they are comfortable using the pencil. Then say: Now find two clues in the picture that tell you about the weather. Use your pencil to circle the two clues. 
        • When children have circled two clues, ask volunteers: Can you name one clue you circled? Did anyone else circle [item]? What does [item] tell you about weather? 
        • Remind children to identify observations that help them describe weather. 

        As children complete the Visualize It activity, you may want to elicit understanding with a few prompts, such as:  

        • Why do you think the bird’s feathers are moving?
        • What does Quack mean when he says the wind is too windy?
        • What happens to Quack’s acorn hat?
        • Why do you think Newton’s apple doesn’t blow away in the wind?
        • What clues tell you a strong wind is blowing when Chirp and Peep are holding their favorite leaves in their beaks?
        • How do you know when the wind stops blowing?
        • How does the wind affect the character’s activity? Has the weather ever affected something you were doing?
        • How would you describe wind to someone who has never experienced it?
        • What other questions do you have about wind?

        TIP: If time allows, you may want children to observe evidence of wind in real-life images. You can have them view section 00:56-01:31 in the Different Types of Weather video. 

        Page 4: In the Sky 

        The PEEP and the Changing Sky video focuses on clues in the sky (clouds, sun, etc.). The additional factors of weather—wind, temperature, and snow or rain—are woven into the storyline to help reinforce children’s understanding of factors across all weather phenomena. 

        • Read the screen text aloud. Allow volunteers to share what they know about clues in the sky that tell about weather. You can ask questions such as:
          • Where can you find clues that tell about the weather?
          • What are some things you see in the sky?
          • What do you think [dark clouds, a colorful rainbow, etc.] tell about weather?
          • Does it always rain when it is cloudy? How do you know?
          • Is it always warm when it is sunny? How do you know?

        Tell children they are going to watch a video about clues in the sky that tell about weather. Encourage them to look for clues in the sky that tell them about the weather.

        • Play the video through once without pausing.

        After the first viewing, have children complete the Visualize It: Changing Sky Clues to gain evidence of their understanding of clues in the sky that tell about weather. If you need to go over how to complete the Visualize activity with children, review the instructions for the PEEP and the TOO Windy Day video section above. When children have circled two clues, ask volunteers:

        • Can you name one clue you circled? Did anyone else circle [item]? What does [item] tell you about the weather? Is [item] a clue you found in the Stormy Weather video, too? Why do you think it was/wasn’t in the video?

        As children complete the Visualize It activity, you may want to elicit understanding with a few prompts, such as:  

        • Is the sky the same or different from the sky in the PEEP and the TOO Windy Day video? How?
        • What do the fat gray clouds tell about the weather?
        • Why do you think the clouds are moving?
        • What does the blue sky tell about the weather?
        • How do clouds change the weather?  
        • Have you ever experienced this kind of weather? Tell us about it.
        • What other questions do you have about clues found in the sky?

        TIP: If time allows, you may want children to observe evidence of weather from real-life images. You can have them view any section of the Different Types of Weather video.

        Page 5: Hot and Cold

        The PEEP and the Chilly Dam video focuses on temperature. The additional factors of weather—wind, precipitation, and sunlight and clouds in the sky—are woven into the storyline to help reinforce children’s understanding of factors across all weather phenomena. 

        • Read the screen text aloud. Allow volunteers to share what they know about temperature. Elicit responses to the last question.
        • Encourage children to share an experience they have had with changing temperatures.

        Tell children they are going to watch a video about temperature. Encourage them to look for clues about temperature that tell them about the weather.

        • Play the video through once without pausing.

        After the first viewing, have children complete the Visualize It: Chilly Dam Clues to gain evidence of their understanding of temperature. If you need to go over how to complete the Visualize It activity with children, review the instructions for the PEEP and the TOO Windy Day video section above. When children have circled two clues, ask volunteers:

        • Can you name one clue you circled? Did anyone else circle [item]? What does [item] tell you about wind? Is [item] a clue you found in the PEEP and the Chilly Dam video, too? Why do you think it was/wasn’t in the video?

        As children complete the Visualize It activity, you may want to elicit understanding with a few prompts, such as:  

        • What clues in the video help you describe temperature?
        • How was the temperature at Peep’s can different from Beaver Boy’s dam? 
        • How was temperature different during different times of the day?  
        • How does the weather affect the characters? Has the weather ever affected something you were doing?
        • Have you ever experienced this kind of weather? Tell us about it. 
        • How would you explain a hot day to a friend? A warm day?
        • What other questions do you have about temperature?

        TIP: If time allows, you may want children to observe evidence of temperature from real-life images. You can have them view any section of the Different Types of Weather video.

        Page 6: Water in the Sky 

        The PEEP and the Rainy, Snowy Day video focuses on rain and snow (and precipitation more generally). The additional factors of weather—wind, temperature, and sunlight and clouds—are woven into the storyline to help reinforce children’s understanding of weather factors across all weather phenomena.

        • Read the screen text aloud. Allow volunteers to describe their experiences with rain and snow. 
        • Explain that snow is frozen water. Snow starts as tiny drops of water in the clouds. The drops turn to small ice crystals before they fall to the ground. Ask children:
          • Do you know any other form of water that falls to the ground from the clouds? 
        • Tell children they are going to watch a video about rain and snow. Encourage children to look for clues that tell them about rain and snow. 
        • Play the video through once without pausing.

        After the first viewing, have children complete the Visualize It: Rainy, Snowy Day Clues to gain evidence of their understanding of the factors that describe weather. If you need to go over how to complete the Visualize It activity with children, review the instructions for the PEEP and the TOO Windy Day video section above. When children have circled two clues, ask volunteers:

        • Can you name one clue you circled? Did anyone else circle [item]? What does [item] tell you about weather? Is [item] a clue you found in any of the other weather videos? Why do you think it was/wasn’t in the video?

        As children complete the Visualize It activity, you may want to elicit understanding with a few prompts, such as:  

        • What do you notice about the sky?
        • Why do you think Chirp and Quack are shivering?
        • How does the weather change in the video? What evidence told you it changed?
        • Do you think Peep will get his wish, and it will snow forever? Why?
        • Have you ever experienced this kind of weather? Tell us about it. 
        • How would you describe rain or snow to someone who has never experienced it?
        • What other questions do you have about rain or snow?

        TIP: If time allows, you may want children to observe evidence of precipitation (snow and rain) in real-life images. You can have them view section 00:00-00:55 in the Different Types of Weather video. 

        At the end of your discussion, explain to children that they will work more on the interactive lesson in the next session.

        Part 3: A Closer Look at Weather Factors

        (20-minute class period)

        Children will continue to identify observations that help them describe and compare different types of weather. They will use weather clues to choose characters dressed for different types of weather. 

        Handouts are needed if children are not working on individual devices: 

        • Dress for the Weather

        Explain

        Before continuing the interactive lesson:

        If you have already viewed the individual sections of the Different Types of Weather video, you may choose to skip page 7, which views the full video, or you may want to use the video as a review for children. 

        • Project page 7 of the interactive lesson on the screen or wall. If children are using individual devices, be sure they have the same page visible in full screen on each device. 
          • If you haven’t already introduced the science term evidence to children, you might want to do so at the start of Part 3 of the lesson. You can tell children that you want them to think like scientists and use the word evidence instead of clues, like scientists do when they are investigating. Then say: Let’s think like scientists and look for evidence that tells about different types of weather. 

        Review with children what they know about weather. Talk about the PEEP and the Big Wide World videos and different clues they observed that helped them describe weather in each of the videos. Encourage children to identify observations of weather factors that help them describe different types of weather. Record responses on the “Ideas About Weather” chart. You can ask questions such as:

        • What is the weather outside today? Is it the same as yesterday? How is it the same or different?
        • What clues do you see outside that tell you about the weather?
        • Can you find clues in the classroom that tell what the weather is outside? (rain boots, mittens, etc.) Were the same clues here yesterday? Why do you think that is?
        • What are the four factors that describe the weather?

        Explore

        Page 7: Different Types of Weather

        Review what children learned about weather from Peep, Chirp, and Quack. Then explain to children they are going to watch a video called Different Types of Weather that shows real-life images of the types of weather. Encourage children to look for evidence in the real weather videos just like they did in the PEEP weather videos. 

        • Instruct children to use their eyes and ears to help them identify evidence about different types of weather. 
        • Play the Different Types of Weather through once through without pausing.

        Play the video a second time. Pause as you ask questions such as:

        • What does the sky tell you about the weather? 
        • What types of weather make sound in the video? Do they make the same sound? 
        • What do the moving flags tell you about weather? 
        • Have you ever been outside on a windy day? How did it feel? Look? Sound? 
        • Can you describe the weather in the playground image? 
        • How would you describe a snowy day to someone who has never experienced it? A windy day? A sunny, rainy day? A rain storm? A cold, sunny day?
        • Have you ever seen the weather change? Can you describe what happened?
        • What’s one new thing you learned about weather that you didn’t know before?
        • What questions do you still have about weather?

        End the discussion of different types of weather by asking children to use what they now know about weather to describe a windy day; a sunny, rainy day; a rainstorm; and a sunny, snowy day. 

        Evaluate

        Page 8: Dress for the Weather

        Direct children’s attention to the image. Have them identify and describe evidence that tells about the weather in the picture. Encourage them to find evidence of the four factors.

        • Read the text aloud. 
        • Ask children to share an experience they had (or a family member had) when they looked at the weather before getting dressed. 
        • You may want to share with children an experience you had when you listened to a meteorologist to help you plan what to wear one day.

        After the discussion, introduce the “Dress for the Weather” activity. Distribute the handout if children are not working on individual devices. Explain to children that they will be looking for evidence that tells about weather in different pictures. Then they will match different types of weather to the clothes a child wears to play in that type of weather. Have children work along with you as you demonstrate how to move the characters around.

        • Click on the purple Arrange It button. Check to be sure children have the “Dress for the Weather” activity in full screen on their device. 
        • Focus children’s attention on the four types of weather. Encourage children to look for evidence of the four factors in each picture. 
        • Draw attention to the characters and explain that each child got dressed up to go outside and play. Say: Let’s look for clues to help us figure out what weather each one is dressed for!
          • Point to one weather box and ask: What evidence tells you about the type of weather in this picture? 
          • Have children look at the characters. Ask: What would you wear outside on a [rainy] day? Why? Let’s look at the characters and see what clues we can find that tell us they are ready to go out and play in the [rain].
          • Have children drag the character to the weather image. You may need to circulate to help children drag the characters on the screen. As you do, you may want to ask questions to elicit understanding, such as: Why does he need a hat on a [rainy] day? Why is the boy’s scarf blowing around?

        Note: You can choose to have children complete this activity in one of two ways: 

        1. Look at a particular type kind of weather. Have children suggest different items of clothing that are needed to play in that weather condition. Children can look for the character with those clothes. 
        2. Look at each character and talk about the different clothing he or she is wearing. Children can determine the type of weather the children are dressed for.

        Elaborate

        Page 9: Review Weather Clues

        Review children’s understanding of different types of weather. Tell children they are going to become weather detectives and find clues that tell about the weather in each picture. Say: Look carefully for clues that tell about the weather in each picture. But look for clues that tell about the weather before the pictures were taken, too. 

        Read the screen text aloud. Then have volunteers identify evidence that tells about the weather and about how the weather changed. Ask questions such as:

        • What do you think the weather was like before this picture was taken? How do you know?
        • What evidence can you find that tells the weather changed? Explain.
        • How would you describe the weather to a friend? 
        • Have you ever been outside when the weather changed? Can you describe what it was like? What did it feel like? Sound like?

        Close out the lesson with a brief discussion to allow children to reflect on their learning. Acknowledge all the new ideas children added to the “Ideas About Weather” chart throughout the lesson. Then have children observe and describe the weather outside. You might ask a few questions, such as:

        • Can you describe one new thing you learned today about the weather?
        • What is your favorite type of weather? Why?
        • What else would you like to learn about weather?

        Contributor:
        Funder:

        You must be logged in to use this feature

        Need an account?
        Register Now