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        Chicago, Gangsters, Bootleggers, and Crime | Ken Burns: Prohibition

        View images of public enemy number one, mobster Al Capone, as well as other gangsters, bootleggers, and violent gangs of the era. From 1920-1933, the United States was a dry country. The 18th Amendment to the Constitution prohibited the making, transportation, and sale of alcohol. The law, as explained in the Ken Burns’ film Prohibition, “turned law-abiding citizens into criminals.” It also proved to be a lucrative business venture for gangsters and bootleggers, who took over once legitimate businesses to illegally supply alcohol to Americans. The prominence and power of gangsters during Prohibition grew as a result.

        Al Capone with a Cigar | Ken Burns: Prohibition

        Al Capone, with a cigar and a big smile, leaving Federal Building in Miami, Florida, preceded by his attorney, Abe Teitelbaum. Source: The Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

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        Purple Gang Trial | Ken Burns: Prohibition

        Purple Gang Trial. Source: Wayne State University.

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        The Body of Earl "Hymie" Weiss | Ken Burns: Prohibition

        The body of Earl "Hymie" Weiss after he was gunned down on State Street. Source: Chicago History Museum; scanned from the book, "Historic Photos of Chicago Crime: The Capone Era," page 135.

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        Murder Victim | Ken Burns: Prohibition

        A murder victim is carried out of a barber shop in New York, 1930. Source: John Binder Collection.

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        George Remus | Ken Burns: Prohibition

        George Remus in prison, facing trial for the murder of his wife, Imogene Remus. Source: San Francisco Public Library.

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        Chicagoans Celebrate the Repeal of Prohibition | Ken Burns: Prohibition

        Chicagoans celebrate the repeal of Prohibition at the Congress Hotel on December 8, 1933. One lasting effect of Prohibition: men and women seen drinking together. Source: John Binder Collection.

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        Gangster Lineup, Chicago | Ken Burns: Prohibition

        Gangster lineup, Chicago. From left to right: Paul "The Waiter" Ricca, Sal Aguglia (Capone's New York cousin), Lucky Luciano, Meyer Lansky, Rocco Fischetti (Capone's Chicago cousin) and Harry "Three Finger" Brown. Source: John Binder Collection.

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        Chicago at Night | Ken Burns: Prohibition

        Chicago at night. Source: Chicago History Museum: Scanned from book, "Historic Photos of Chicago Crime: The Capone Era," page 74.

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        Al Capone Mugshots | Ken Burns: Prohibition

        Two mug shots of Al Capone taken by the Miami police. Source: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division.

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        Free Soup Kitchen in Chicago | Ken Burns: Prohibition

        Free soup kitchen in Chicago, paid for by Al Capone. Source: National Archives & Records Administration.

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        Gangland Murder Scene | Ken Burns: Prohibition

        A policeman guards a gangland murder scene in a Cleveland restaurant, 1932. Source: John Binder Collection.

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        Line-Up of Jewish Gangsters, 1931 | Ken Burns: Prohibition

        A line-up of Jewish gangsters in New York, 1931. From left to right: Joseph "Nig" Rosen, Ben "Bugsy" Siegel, Harry Teitelbaum, Harry Greenberg, and Louis Buckhouse (a/k/a Louis "Lepke" Buchalter). Source: John Binder Collection.

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        Bootlegger Charley Birger | Ken Burns: Prohibition

        The bootlegger, Charley Birger (seated, center on car roof, with machine gun) and his Illinois gang in 1927. Birger was convicted of murder and hanged the following year. The cabin in the background was lined with armor plate for protection. Source: Kentucky Historical Society.

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        Loading Whiskey, Bermuda | Ken Burns: Prohibition

        Loading whiskey, Bermuda. Source: Mariners Museum, Newport News.

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        A Line of Shamefaced Bootleggers | Ken Burns: Prohibition

        A line of shamefaced bootleggers in a Detroit, Michigan police station, 1929. Source: Photofest.

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