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        Communicate the Solution | Engineering for Good

        How will you tell your community about your solution? Students will plan, write and produce a one-minute video or digital story or narrated slideshow to communicate their solution. Students will participate in peer feedback. This is lesson 9 of 10 in Engineering for Good, a NGSS-aligned, project-based learning unit.

        KQED Teach is here to support you in doing these projects with your students. We encourage you to take or review our self-paced courses, Making Infographics and Video Storytelling Essentials, prior to beginning this unit if you are not already regularly integrating media projects into your classroom. Sign up is required (and free) to access courses.

        Engineering for Good Unit

        Lesson Summary

        How will you tell your community about your solution? In this lesson, students will plan, write and produce a one-minute video or digital story or narrated slideshow to communicate their solution. Students will participate in peer feedback.

        Time Allotment

        120 minutes

        Learning Objectives

        Students will plan, write and produce a one-minute video or digital story or narrated slideshow to communicate their solution. Students will participate in peer feedback.

        Supplies

        Essential Question

        How will you tell your community about your solution?

        Introductory Activity

        Introduction/Hook

        Note: The procedure for having students produce their videos follows the same procedure you learned about and followed in the KQED Teach Video Storytelling Essentials course. Please refer to that course for more information on each of the steps.

        1. Review the Engineering Design Process diagram on page 3 of the Engineering for Good student notebook. Discuss the final step of the process, “communicate your solution.” 

        2. Describe the video project to students. The videos will be informational videos (or narrated slideshows) about their solutions that are no more than 60 seconds in length. The videos need to do the following:

        3. State the problem/need that is being addressed

        4. Describe and show their solution

        5. Describe how their solution meets the need

        6. State why it is a good solution (students can compare their solution to what’s being done today, if anything)

        Learning Activities

        Guided Practice

        1. Review the Engineering for Good video rubric with the class (on page 20 of the student notebook).

        2. In their small groups, have students fill out the Engineering for Good story spine on page 18 of their student notebooks. They should use their problem statements from page 9 of their notebooks to help complete the story spine.

        3. Then, in their groups, students will use the story spine to develop the Engineering for Good storyboard on page 19 of their notebooks. Students should

        4. Use multimedia created as part of the project, like the infographic, images, and drawings or prototypes of their solutions for some of the “shots.” 

        5. Practice the script to make sure the video will be less than 60 seconds.

        6. Students shoot their videos. You may choose to assign students roles within their small groups, such as videographer, narrator, director, editor, etc.

        7. They can use whatever technology you have available: smartphones, tablets, computers with cameras, etc.

        8. Make sure to get the permission of anyone appearing in the video and for the location of the shoot.

        9. Discuss tips for shooting video.

        Independent Practice

        1. Students work in their small groups to edit their videos.

        • Any video editing tools can be used. We suggest using Adobe Spark.
        • Remind students that their completed videos should be no more than 60 seconds in length.
        • Students should credit sources of any media they use that’s not theirs. (Students should not use any copyrighted images, video or music without permission of the owner. Please see the resources section for a few websites that have media available for use in student projects.)

        2. As time allows and students finish, pair student groups together for peer review and feedback of video rough cuts. (Alternatively, you can hold an classwide screening of the students’ rough cut videos and have three people provide feedback for each video.)

        3. With the class, review the feedback guidelines and the process for giving feedback that is on page 21 of the student notebook.

        4. In each pair of small groups,Group A shows their video. Group B watches the video without commenting.

        5. Each person in Group B gives feedback including two things they like and one thing that could be improved. 

        6. Group A records the feedback on page 21 of their notebooks. 

        7. The groups switch roles. 

        8. Students revise their videos based on the feedback they received.

        Culminating Activity

        Homework

        Students finish editing their videos, if necessary.

        Assessment

        Engineering for Good video rubric

        Resources

        NOAA’s Marine Debris Program website has videos and images that are in the public domain and are free for students to use in their videos.

        https://marinedebris.noaa.gov/multimedia

         

        The Plastic Pollution Coalition has made SOME images available on Flickr through a Creative Commons license*. Be sure to check an individual image for its permissions; some are copyright protected.

        https://www.flickr.com/photos/plasticpollution/albums/with/72157623413953262

         

        Colleen Proppe has images of art created with plastic found on a beach by a third-grade class. These are also available to use through a Creative Commons license*.

        https://www.flickr.com/photos/cproppe/albums/72157625994748804

         

        *Students must provide attribution for all photos used.

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