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        8-10,13+

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        Ping Pong: Challenging Stereotypes: A New Look at Old Age

        As baby boomers transition into retirement and younger people are taxed to fund social security and services for the growing population of elderly people, intergenerational understanding is increasingly important. This lesson contributes to that understanding while also providing a writing opportunity that is especially appropriate for English language learners. In this lesson, students will use film clips from the documentaryPing Pong to examine stereotypes about senior citizens. As part of that examination, they will look at adjectives typically used to describe the elderly and write news stories reporting on the events they saw in the film clips.

        Lesson Summary

        As baby boomers transition into retirement and younger people are taxed to fund social security and services for the growing population of elderly people, intergenerational understanding is increasingly important. This lesson contributes to that understanding while also providing a writing opportunity that is especially appropriate for English language learners. In this lesson, students will use film clips from the documentaryPing Pong to examine stereotypes about senior citizens. As part of that examination, they will look at adjectives typically used to describe the elderly and write news stories reporting on the events they saw in the film clips.

        Time Allotment

        One 50-minute class period, plus a short homework assignment

        Learning Objectives

        • Understand what distinguishes adjectives from other parts of speech
        • Understand how journalists use adjectives and how writers' choices influence readers' beliefs
        • Understand the differences between journalism and other forms of writing (e.g., narrative, instructional, persuasive)
        • Write short news reports
        • Separate fact from fiction in stereotypes about the elderly and identify the sources of their own beliefs about senior citizens

        Supplies

        • Internet access and equipment to show the class online video and project student writing

        Introductory Activity

        1. As a class, quickly brainstorm a list of words that come to mind when you hear "senior citizens" or "the elderly."

        2. Take the list and, working in small teams, organize the words on the list into grammatical categories (i.e., group nouns, adjectives, verbs). Project one of the team's answers and use it to let other teams compare and make any corrections necessary, explaining the differences in the word categories as needed.

        3. To prepare students for the film, tell the students they will be watching clips from a British film called Ping Pong and they'll be introduced to two athletes, Les and Inge. Also note that because the film is British, there may be some unfamiliar terminology (e.g., what in the United States would be called a "paddle," the British call a "bat"). Let them know that after the clips, they will review their list of words and have an opportunity to make changes.

        Learning Activities

        4. Keeping the students' list of words where they can reference it, show the film clips in the order listed above. Pause after each clip to check for comprehension of vocabulary and, as time allows, invite reactions.

        5. After the clips, ask students how the film affirmed and/or challenged their ideas about old people. Briefly discuss stereotypes that come up and invite students to comment on the sources of their ideas. Talk about who benefits and who is harmed by stereotypes. Begin to wrap up the activity by giving students a few minutes to re-examine their original list and add to it or delete words from it as appropriate.

        Culminating Activity

        6. Note how many of the class list words are adjectives. Then, as an assessment, give students the following homework assignment: Write two brief news reports about either Les or Inge. (In other words, both reports should focus on the same person.) One report must leave out adjectives. The other must use adjectives. If needed, describe how a news report differs from instructional writing (e.g., their assignment isn't about how to play ping pong) or fictional narrative (e.g., you can't invent dialogue). Make the film clips available so students can view them again as needed.

        On the day that the assignment is due, spend five minutes reviewing what students learned about adjectives and writing from the exercise.

        As an option, you could also use this as an opportunity for students to practice online research skills by telling them that their reports need to include some background information not available in the film.

        EXTENSIONS

        1. Have students post their news stories to a class wiki and invite them to look at the differences. Use the comparison as a springboard for discussing the concept of objectivity in journalism. Consider inviting students to follow the news closely for a week and bring to class examples of how reporters used adjectives.

        2. Arrange for students to host a screening of the film and lead a discussion of it at a local senior center or nursing home. Alternatively, have students conduct and share oral history interviews with current or former athletes who are older than 80.

        3. Use the lesson as a springboard for a health-class unit on healthy aging.

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