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        6-9,13+

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        POV | The Barber of Birmingham: Exploring the Heroes of Social Justice Movements - Lesson Plan

        POV often presents stories that express opinions and perspectives rarely featured in mainstream media; stories like that of James Armstrong, a barber in Birmingham, Alabama, who was one of thousands of unknown and unsung heroes of the civil rights struggle of the 1960s. In this lesson, students will identify and research participants in social justice movements or other types of movements or communities. Students will select images, quotes, pieces of art or videos to represent such figures and organize these items in walls or digital "pinboard" displays that will be presented to the class. This activity is inspired by a wall display in the barbershop of civil rights veteran James Armstrong, as seen in a clip from the documentary The Barber of Birmingham: Foot Soldier of the Civil Rights Movement. For more information on James Armstrong, the civil rights movement and how to use digital "pinboards" in the classroom, please see the Resources sections of this lesson.

        The Barber of Birmingham: The Worst Thing a Man Can Do

        In this 2012 Oscar-nominated short film, Alabama barber and civil rights veteran James Armstrong experiences the fulfillment of an unimaginable dream: the election of the first African-American president. In this clip, James Armstrong remembers how he always thought that the worst thing a man could do was "nothing."

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        The Barber of Birmingham: Integrating the Schools

        Alabama barber and civil rights veteran James Armstrong experiences the fulfillment of an unimaginable dream: the election of the first African-American president. In this clip, James Armstrong and his son remember the historic moment when their local school became integrated and the Armstrong boys became some of the first black students to attend.

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