All Subjects
      All Types

        Info

        Grades

        2-7

        Permitted Use

        Stream, Download and Share


        Part of Reading Rockets
        89 Favorites
        2981 Views

        Rosemary Wells

        Rosemary Wells is the author and illustrator of delightful books for youngsters. In this interview, Wells talks about creating books for children and their adult readers that will stand up to being read over and over again. Watch the interview, view the interview transcript, read a short biography on Rosemary Wells, or see a selected list of her children's books.

        http://www.readingrockets.org/books/interviews/wells

        Digging into the Past for Stories

        Rosemary Wells loves history. When she was young, dinner table conversations usually revolved around the current day politics, world situation and history. Learn how Rosemary Wells views the difference between writing for young children versus writing for young adults, and discover how her dinner table conversations led to her love of history.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download and Share

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        The Mythology of Lincoln

        In her research, Rosemary Wells dug deep into the biographies and source materials on Lincoln to learn more about the man behind the well-known stories, including his schooling and life as a child.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download and Share

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        Through the Voices of Willie and Tad

        Rosemary Wells describes how her book "Abraham Lincoln and His Boys" shows Lincoln as a wonderful father as she reveals some of the stories of his family life that she found in her research.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download and Share

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        Seeing the World Small

        Rosemary Wells explains how she uses point of view to help determine what stays in a book and what is edited out. She says, "I know what kids at various ages comprehend and what interests them because children always see the world small."

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download and Share

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        Walking Through Photographs

        Rosemary Wells studies archival photographs very carefully, absorbing all the details, and tries to imagine the people in the photographs coming to life. She explains in this interview how she used this method to make Abraham Lincoln come to life as she was writing "Lincoln and His Boys."

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download and Share

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        Women's Diaries

        Rosemary Wells describes why Civil War diaries proved to be less revealing than she had originally hoped. She attributes this to a Victorian sensibility about what could be written about, or not written about.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download and Share

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        No Brighter, No Truer, No More False Than We

        Rosemary wells discusses why writers who choose historical subjects bring their modern perspective to their writing, and explains the importance of accepting the historical figures in the context of when they lived.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download and Share

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        The Light at the Stern of the Boat

        Rosemary Wells discusses the plot formation and her research from "Red Moon at Sharpsburg" and uses it to showcase the importance of observing our past to see where we're headed. Historian Barbara Tuchman said, “We must always look to the light at the stern of our boat to see where we've been or we will drive it into another reef.”

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download and Share

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        Breathing Life into History

        Rosemary Wells compares and contracts historical fiction with non-fiction, and explains how good historical fiction gets the facts right, but also gives the reader a colorful hero or heroine, someone to walk through history with.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download and Share

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        Finding the Emotional Content

        Rosemary Wells describes how historical fiction gives the reader a character and the emotional content to make a personal connection. Historical fiction answers the question "What does it have to do with me?"

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download and Share

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        I Sit Down and the Book is There

        Rosemary Wells explains how she doesn't believe in a specific writing "process." The books just seem to arrive. "I am just a scribe," she says. She also shares the plot of a new book called "On the Blue Comet."

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download and Share

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        An Excerpt from "Red Moon at Sharpsburg"

        Hear Rosemary Wells read an excerpt from her book "Red Moon at Sharpsburg." In this excerpt, two young characters are discussing how, to them, the reasons for the Civil War faded over time, and how life will one day return to normal.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download and Share

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        An Excerpt from "Lincoln and His Boys"

        Rosemary Wells reads aloud from "Lincoln and His Boys." In this passage, Lincoln and Willie and Robert and Tad (the three Lincoln boys) and Mrs. Lincoln are traveling from Springfield, Illinois, to Washington — five years before the end of the war. We meet a loving and playful father.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream, Download and Share

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        Close

        Contributor:
        Funder:
        Funder:

        You must be logged in to use this feature

        Need an account?
        Register Now