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        Amphibians, Reptiles, and Mammals | Gorongosa Park

        Large and small, Gorongosa Park is home to more species of animals than scientists can count. Check out the stunning biodiversity found throughout the park in these high definition images, courtesy of Piotr Naskrecki.

        Shovel-Nosed Frog

        Shovel-nosed frog (Hemisus marmoratus). I think you will agree that a direct translation of its scientific name, the Marbled half-piglet, is more appropriate.

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        Horseshoe Bat in Flight

        Horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus landeri)

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        Flap-necked chameleon

        Flap-necked chameleon

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        Yellow-Spotted Tree Frog

        Yellow-spotted tree frogs (Leptopelis flavomaculatus)

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        Horseshoe Bat

        Horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus landeri)

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        Mount Gorongosa Pygmy Chameleon

        The Mt. Gorongosa Pygmy Chameleon may be smaller than your pinky finger, but it is a magnificent symbol of Mt. Gorongosa_s unique ecosystem. I found this female and a newly hatched baby sitting close to each other on the same branch, and soon the young chameleon climbed the adult and stayed on top of her for a while. Pygmy chameleons generally take a few months to hatch from eggs, and thus it is not certain that she was the baby_s mother. Still adorable, though.

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        Twig Snake

        Here is one of my favorite Mozambican species, the Twig snake (Thelotornis capensis). It is not an aggressive species, and its deadly venomousness was only discovered when it killed the famous German herpetologist Robert Mertens, who got bitten while feeding his pet Twig snake.

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        Leptopelis Frog

        Leptopelis Frog

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        Red African Toad

        Red African toads (Schismaderma carens) are coming out to feed. This is definitely one of the prettiest toads in the world.

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        Gorongosa Tree Frog

        Tree frogs (Chiromantis xerampelina) build their big, foamy nests over every puddle and pond in Gorongosa.

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