All Subjects
      All Types

        Info

        Grades

        3-5, 13+

        Permitted Use


        Part of Great States
        0 Favorites
        126 Views

        Idaho | Activity 6.5: The Basques and Their Role in Idaho’s History

        Students watch a video about when the Basques settled in Idaho and their contributions to the state. Students learn about the festivals that Basques hold today, and create a poster for Boise’s annual festival.

        Lesson Summary

        Students watch a video about when the Basques settled in Idaho and their contributions to the state. Students learn about the festivals that Basques hold today, and create a poster for Boise’s annual festival.

        This lesson is part Great States: Idaho | Unit 6: Settling Idaho which examines the resources, opportunities and freedoms that lured different groups to Idaho. Emphasis will be placed on how the arrival of newcomers presented challenges to those already settled in territory.

        Time Allotment

        30 minutes

        Learning Objectives

        Standards:

        4.SS.1.2.1: Identify the major groups and significant individuals and their motives in the western expansion and settlement in Idaho.

        4.SS.5.1.2: Discuss the challenges experienced by people from various cultural, racial, and religious groups that settled in Idaho from various parts of the world.

        Supplemental Standards:

        Boise District 413.18: Identify the major groups and significant individuals and their motives in the western expansion and settlement in Idaho.

        Supplies

        Directions

        1. Explain to students that Basque Americans are Americans of Spanish Basque descent who migrated to the area as far back as 1830. Idaho has the second largest Basque American population in the United States, after California, which has about 20,000 Basque Americans. The US Census does not distinguish between Basque and Spanish populations, but it is said that roughly 6,600 Basques live in Idaho. The first Basques in the region were attracted to Idaho with dreams of mining silver, but turned to sheep herding and ranching to make a living after the draw of places such as Silver City proved to not be as profitable as hoped.

        1. Tell your students they will be watching a short video about the peoples of Idaho. The video covers many groups who came to Idaho over the years, but tell the students to pay close attention to the details about the Basque population.

        1. Play the video, PBS Great States | Idaho Culture [3:57].

        1. Ask students the following questions:

          1. When did the Basques begin to arrive in Idaho?

          2. What skills did they have?

          3. What type of celebrations do they hold?

        1. Project the image of a Basque festival. Allow a few minutes for your students to examine the clothes, dance style, and other elements of the photograph.



          [Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mondrag%C3%B3n_-_Danzas_vascas_1.JPG]

        1. Share with your students that there are approximately 400 different Basque dances, each with its own meaning. Some, the more ancient ritual dances, are performed only for particular events or circumstances and initially were performed by male dancers only. You can see here that this dance is a woman’s dance. Many dances include the use of sticks and swords that the dancers strike together as they progress through the movements of the dance. Today’s dances come from early dances but do not have any sacred meaning and now they allow for men and women participation.

        1. Tell students about St. Ignatius of Loyola while you project the painting of him. He is the patron saint of the Basques. He was born in 1491 as Íñigo López in Loyola of Basque country. He experienced a spiritual conversion after suffering a battle wound as a young solider. Íñigo became a Spanish priest and theologian of the early 16th century. St. Ignatius wrote his famous “Spiritual Exercises” and eventually founded the Society of Jesus, the Jesuit order. For 25 years now, the Idaho Basque community has held an annual San Inazio festival in his honor.

          The festival is held on Boise’s Basque Block at the end of every July. Many local musicians and dancers perform, and typical Spanish food such as croquetas, chorizo, and solomo are served. Cathedral mass, picnics, and even sporting events are held—including pala games, a unique Basque game that is similar to racquetball.



          [Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:St_Ignatius_of_Loyola_(1491-1556)_Founder_of_the_Jesuits.jpg]

        1. Have students create a poster that advertises Boise’s annual San Inazio Festival. The poster should mention the following:

          1. Who the festival honors [St. Ignatius of Loyola],

          2. Where it is held [Basque Block]

          3. When it is held [end of July]

          4. Activities or events people can look forward to [music performances, dances, pala games, Spanish food]

        Answer Key

          1. Late 19th century (1800s)

          2. Sheep herding

          3. Picnics and festivals

        For more information on the Basques of Idaho, visit the Basque Center in Idaho: http://www.basquecenter.com/ or The Basque Museum https://www.basquemuseum.com/

        Contributor:
        Producer:

        You must be logged in to use this feature

        Need an account?
        Register Now