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        4-7, 13+

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        Part of Great States
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        Minnesota | Activity 2.3: Say “Cheese” - How Images Can Reveal Much About a Culture

        Students spend time analyzing photos of different American Indian chiefs. The activities are designed to generate conversation regarding physical similarities and differences as well as discussion of culture, clothes, and lifestyle. 

        Lesson Summary

        Students spend time analyzing photos of different American Indian chiefs. The activities are designed to generate conversation regarding physical similarities and differences as well as discussion of culture, clothes, and lifestyle. 

        This lesson is part of "Great States: Minnesota | Unit 2: Dakota and Anishinaabe" which compares the Dakota and Anishinaabe people and emphasizes what makes each of these indigenous groups special and unique.

        Time Allotment

        15 minutes

        Learning Objectives

        Standard: 

        6.4.4.15.1: Compare and contrast the Dakota and Anishinaabe nations prior to 1800, describe their interactions with each other and other indigenous peoples. 

        Supplies

        Directions

        1. Show students the images, Cut Nose | Native American Civilizations | U.S. History (a Dakota Sioux Chief), Chippewa Chief | Native American Civilizations | U.S. History, and Sioux Chief | Native American Civilizations | U.S. History.
        2. Explain that these men were all chiefs of different Minnesota nations. First, ask students to make general observations about each image.
        3. Ask students to provide their opinion regarding the images and to describe the similarities between the chiefs. What are they wearing in common? What type of pose do they have? What type of expressions do they have?
        4. Ask students to use adjectives to describe what they think the chiefs represent based on the images. What are some of the reasons they look the way they do? What does this say about the other members of the nations the chiefs belong to?

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