All Subjects
      All Types

        Info

        Grades

        10-12

        Permitted Use

        Stream Only


        Part of Community Idea Stations
        0 Favorites
        24 Views

        Judicial Independence in the New World

        Virginia has always been at the heart of our country’s history; the Jamestown settlement laid the foundation for our country’s government, and with that, the beginning of our judicial system as we know it. The court system is an ever-changing and evolving entity and there are key moments of history when Virginia’s people and its judicial system made their everlasting impressions on the country. 

         

        Judicial Independence in the New World tells the story of the development of the court system in the early years of our nation’s history. Historians will take us back to Court Days, Pre-Revolution and Post-Revolution periods to explain the rule of law and the basics of the court system we know today.

         

        Narrated by David Baldacci.

         

        Judicial Independence Introduction -1

        Virginia has always been at the heart of our country’s history; the Jamestown settlement laid the foundation for our country’s government, and with that, the beginning of our judicial system as we know it.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream Only

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        × Close

        Virginia Colonial Judicial System - 2

        In 1776, the American colonies declared independence from English rule. The newly formed states needed to establish new governments. Virginia led the way with the first state constitution and the first declaration of rights.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream Only

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        × Close

        Court Days - 3

        As the population in the colonies grew, new counties were formed to make justice more accessible. Monthly court sessions known as “Court Day” became woven into the fabric of society.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream Only

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        × Close

        American Revolution Period - 4

        When Britain began to take steps that colonist thought were not consistent with their rights, they pointed to the language in the Virginia Charter of 1606 to protect those rights.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream Only

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        × Close

        Rule of Law - 5

        Rule of Law is the principle that law, not individuals, governs a nation. It means that no man or woman is above the law. All citizens are subject to the law. Over time, it has evolved through judicial interpretation.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream Only

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        × Close

        Virginia Courts and the Constitution - 6

        James Madison inserted Article 1 Section 10, the Contract Clause, into the U. S. Constitution. This provision prohibited a state’s legislature from passing any law impairing the obligation of contracts. It limited the power of the states and led to the formation of the federal courts.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream Only

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        × Close

        John Marshall and Judicial Review

        The United States Supreme Court would not exercise its full power until John Marshall became the fourth Chief Justice in 1801. The Supreme Court’s decision in the 1803 Marbury vs Madison case established the precedent of judicial review.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream Only

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        × Close

        Producer:

        You must be logged in to use this feature

        Need an account?
        Register Now