All Subjects
      All Types

        Info

        Grades

        PreK-1,13+

        Permitted Use


        Part of KET
        53 Favorites
        2749 Views

        Math + Arts | Shapes & Patterns

        In this lesson, students will watch videos about shapes and identify shapes in their environment and in art.

        Lesson Summary

        There are three options for this lesson, depending on class needs and time available:

        1. Frame, Focus, and Reflection (view and discuss): students will watch a video about shapes in the real world, find shapes in the classroom, and identify shapes in art; students will draw “shape faces.”

        2. Short hands-on activity: students will view a video about shapes and relative positions and explore right triangles.

        3. Project (view and discuss): students will view a video about shapes and patterns and create a picture frame decorated with shape patterns.

        Time Allotment

        1. Frame, Focus, and Reflection (view and discuss): 1 class period

        2. Short hands-on activity: 1 class period

        3. Project: 1 class period

        Learning Objectives

        Math

        I can describe positions such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.

        I can determine that size does not affect the name of the shape.

        I can determine that orientation does not affect the name of the shape.

        I can analyze how to put simple shapes together to compose a new or larger shape.

        I can identify shapes in the real world.

        I can recognize and identify squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, and hexagons. I can draw shapes.

        Arts and Humanities

        I can identify and draw shapes.

        I can recognize relationships (above, behind, etc.)

        I can use scissors to cut out shapes and explore combining shapes in different ways.

        I can identify and arrange geometric shapes to create a pattern.

        Prep for Teachers

        The focus in this lesson is on identifying geometric shapes and their relative positions, which uses the same vocabulary as math.

        Students will practice basic skills such as drawing shapes of different sizes in different positions, tracing around a template, and cutting with scissors.

        Supplies

        Drawing paper (computer paper is fine)

        Construction paper or lightweight colored computer paper (the computer paper is easier for them to cut)

        Pre-cut right triangle templates

        Pre-cut cardboard picture frames or cardboard or Matt board cut for picture frames

        Pre-cut, self-adhesive foam geometric shapes

        Media Resources

        KET Everyday Math: Shape House

        KET Everyday Math: Shapes All Around Me

        Peg + Cat: Triangle, Pentagon, Triangle, Square

        Introductory Activity

        Students will need to be able to hold and use scissors.

        Learning Activities

        Frame, Focus, and Reflection

        Introduce or review the names of 2-D shapes—square, circle, rectangle, triangle, and square. Talk about how these shapes are called “flat” shapes or “plane” shapes. It would be helpful to review this concept throughout the lesson and each day. Show Shape House and have students spot these shapes in the classroom. Show the PowerPoint Let’s Look at Art and have students identify shapes that they see in the paintings. Allow them to come up to the board and point out the shapes they see. Have students use the language “above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to” to describe the positions of these shapes.

        Pass out drawing paper and direct students to draw faces using shapes. Model on the board, using a large circle for the face with smaller circles for the eyes, nose, and mouth as students follow along. Then, draw a large triangle for a face and smaller triangles for the eyes, nose, and mouth as students follow along. Finally, challenge students to draw a face using large and small squares. Have students identify facial features using positional words. For example: “Your eyes are above your mouth.” “Your ears are beside your eyes.” “Your eyes are above your nose.”

        Short Activity

        Show Shapes All Around Me.

        Give each student a sheet of construction paper or lightweight colored computer paper, a right triangle template, and a crayon. Instruct students on how to hold down the template with one hand and trace around it with the other hand. It might be easier for them to do this working with a partner. After tracing, students will cut out the triangles with scissors. Have them look at the triangle shape and compare it to things in the classroom. Example: room corner, table tops, etc. Then, illustrate how to put two right triangles together makes a square. Give students time to experiment with combining their triangle with their neighbor’s triangle to make composite shapes.

        Longer Project

        Show Peg + Cat: Triangle, Pentagon, Triangle, Square. Review the names of all shapes, review positional words, and lead a scavenger hunt in the classroom.

        Give students a bag of assorted shapes cut out of self-adhesive foam (should be cut in advance) and a tag board picture frame. Call out a shape and have students respond by holding up that shape (check to make sure). Then, have students stick that shape onto the frame. Call a second shape and so on, letting students create patterns from shapes until the frame is completely covered by shapes.

        Provide positional instructions to create a pattern (such as “Stick the square above the triangle”).

        Students will have a picture frame to take home. They could use it to frame the “shape faces” they drew the first day.

        Formative Assessment

        What are the indicators of student progress toward or achievement of each learning target?

        Math Assessment Problems

        • Distinguished: Students can identify all shapes and use positional words to tell where the shape is located.
        • Proficient: Students can identify all shapes and use positional words to tell where most shapes are located.
        • Apprentice: Students can identify some shapes and use only a few positional words to identify location of shapes.
        • Novice: Student cannot identify all shapes and does not use positional correctly.

        Arts and Humanities

        • Distinguished: Student created a clear pattern of geometric shapes. All pieces are securely adhered.
        • Proficient: Student created a clear pattern of geometric shapes. Most pieces are securely adhered.
        • Apprentice: Student created a pattern of geometric shapes with a few errors. Most pieces are securely adhered.
        • Novice: Student did not create a pattern.

        Program Review

        Where does this fit in? How should you document it?

        This activity contributes to your school’s overall efforts in art programming in several areas, depending on whether you implement just the Frame, Focus, and Reflection portion or you implement the entire project.

        Curriculum and Instruction: Aligned and Rigorous Curriculum

        • To what extent does the school ensure that the arts curriculum encompasses creating, performing, and responding and is fully aligned with the Kentucky Core Academic Standards?
        • To what extent does the school ensure that the school’s curriculum provides opportunities for integration as natural cross-curricular connections are made between the arts and other content areas?
        • To what extent does the school ensure that the arts curriculum includes the study of representative and exemplary works of dance, music, theater, and visual arts from a variety of artists, cultural traditions, and historical periods?

        Lesson Creators: Dianne Simpson, Lesa Gieringer, Amanda Varney, Melissa Roberts, and Judy Sizemore

        Producer:

        You must be logged in to use this feature

        Need an account?
        Register Now