All Subjects
      All Types

        Info

        Grades

        5-9,13+

        Permitted Use

        Stream Only


        8 Favorites
        212 Views

        Test and Evaluate the Prototype | Engineering for Good

        How can you test your prototype? How can your prototype be improved? Students will describe how they would test their prototypes and what type of data they would be generating from their tests. Students will give feedback on other student groups’ designs. This is lesson 7 of 10 in Engineering for Good, a NGSS-aligned, project-based learning unit.

        KQED Teach is here to support you in doing these projects with your students. We encourage you to take or review our self-paced courses, Making Infographics and Video Storytelling Essentials, prior to beginning this unit if you are not already regularly integrating media projects into your classroom. Sign up is required (and free) to access courses.

        Engineering for Good Unit

        Lesson Summary

        In this lesson, students will describe how they would test their prototypes and what type of data they would be generating from their tests. Students will give feedback on other student groups’ designs.

        Time Allotment

        45-60 minutes

        Learning Objectives

        Students will describe how they would test their prototypes and what type of data they would be generating from their tests. Students will give feedback on other student groups’ designs.

        Supplies

        Essential Question

        How can you test your prototype? How can your prototype be improved?

        Introductory Activity

        Introduction/Hook

        1. Review the Engineering Design Process diagram on page 3 of the Engineering for Good student notebook. Discuss the next step of the process, “test and evaluate your prototype.

        2. Recall the Engineering Is Cleaning Drinking Water in Bangladesh story. How did the engineers and scientists test their designs? What kind of data were they looking for?
        3. As a class, discuss why it is important to be testing and improving the design. What if the design works the first time? Use a common item as an example. Why are there new versions of smartphones, computers, light bulbs or cars, even though the first models may have worked?

        Learning Activities

        Guided Practice

        1. In small groups, have students discuss how they would test their designs. Some groups may actually be able to test their prototypes (see extension below). They may have drawings instead of working models, or may not have access to locations where they would test their models. If that’s the case, they can think about how they would test them if they could. What kind of data would they gather to see how well their prototype worked? For example, if their solution was a device that collected plastic items, it may be the number of pieces of plastic collected. Or, if the solution was a device that filtered water to collect plastic pieces, the data may be the percentage of plastic pieces collected. They can record their ideas on page 14 of their notebooks.
        2. Explain that since most groups are not able to test their prototypes, the groups will engage in a feedback process with each other in order to help them improve their designs. (Note: You may wish to invite another class of students or your administrators into your classroom to provide feedback.)
        3. Explain and model the process.

        • There will be a recorder and presenter in each group.
        • Review the feedback guidelines on page 15 of the student notebook.
        • Presenter from Group A takes one minute to explain the group’s prototype.
        • Group B has two minutes to ask questions for clarification about how the prototype works.
        • Group A answers the questions. The recorder takes notes in the table on page 15 of the student notebook.
        • Group B has three minutes to provide feedback. Using the sentence frames on page 15 of their notebooks, each member of Group B offers two things they like and one thing that could be improved.
        • The recorder from Group A records the feedback in the table on page 15 of the student notebook.
        • Groups A and B switch roles.

         

        Independent Practice

        1. Assign a presenter and recorder in each small group.
        2. Pair up the groups to get feedback on their designs.
        3. Set a timer for each part of the process.
        4. Have groups go through the feedback process.
        5. Repeat this process pairing up different groups, as desired.
        6. After the feedback process is complete, have students review their notes in their small groups and circle the items that they think are the most important to address.

        Culminating Activity

        Assessment/Reflection

        Were students successful in providing feedback to their peers about each other’s prototypes?

        Extension

        If it is possible for students to test their prototype after step 1 in Guided Practice, have them do so and record data and notes from their tests on page 14 of their notebooks.

        Contributor:

        You must be logged in to use this feature

        Need an account?
        Register Now