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        Grades

        5-12

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        Analyzing and Comparing Perspectives on Issues - Gorillas

        Students compare and contrast their perspectives on raising gorillas in captivity with their peers and with scientists. They summarize their perspectives and the perspectives of others.

        Lesson Summary

        Overview

        Students compare and contrast their perspectives on raising gorillas in captivity with their peers and with scientists. They then summarize their perspectives and the perspectives of others.

        Why is this an important concept?

        Learners who can identify different perspectives within a text will gain a deep insight into the possible meanings and levels of meaning. They will achieve a fuller understanding of the text. Also, by analyzing and comparing perspectives, learners can begin to determine their own perspective on a topic.

        Grade Level:

        5-7

        Suggested Time

        50-minutes

        Media Resources

        Materials

        The Lesson

        Part I: Learning Activity

        1. Make copies and distribute the Comparing Perspectives handout to each student.

        2. Before viewing the video, ask students to write their perspectives on whether they believe gorillas should be placed into captivity or not and why.

        3. Students interview their partners or group members to find out their perspectives.

        4. Then view the video, focusing on the scientists' perspectives on placing gorillas in captivity in zoos and why.

        5. After viewing the video, students revisit their own perspectives, written before viewing the video. Give students a chance to revise their perspectives in the "After Viewing" column.

        6. Students share their revisions with their group members or partners.

        For Students Who Need Additional Guidance in Completing the Chart

        1. View the video in segments, pausing periodically to discuss scientists' reasons for capturing gorillas and raising them in zoos. Write those ideas on the board.

        • A person is feeding a baby gorilla through a hole in a cage. "... it became illegal to import gorillas from Africa."
        • A large gorilla is pictured. "In fact, in three generations... Colo's family have not raised their own offspring."
        • A baby gorilla is lying on her back looking up at a large gorilla.
        • End of segment.

        2. After viewing the video, students revisit their own perspectives, written before viewing the video. Give students a chance to revise their perspectives in the "After Viewing" column.

        3. Students share their revisions with their group members or partners.

        Part II: Assessment

        1. Students compare their perspectives on the issue of gorilla captivity with those of their peers and those of scientists.

        2. On the Comparing Perspectives handout, each student codes his or her perspective after viewing the video as “M: Mine,” for perspectives that are the same as theirs or “D: Different,” for perspectives that are different from theirs.

        3. On a blank sheet of paper, students summarize their perspectives, the reasons for their perspectives, and who agrees with them. They then summarize the perspectives of those who disagree with and the reasons for their perspectives.

        Portfolio: The completed “Changing Perspectives Handout” can be added to the portfolio to demonstrate how students can identify perspectives like theirs and perspectives that are different from theirs. The summary statement may also be included in the portfolio.

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