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        6-8

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        Making and Monitoring Predictions - Pet Advice and Jamaica Bay

        Students respond to prompts that help them make and monitor predictions about two video segments.   The students are given time to revise their predictions as they watch the videos further. They reflect on whether predicting influenced their comprehension of the texts. 

        Lesson Summary

        Overview

        Students respond to prompts that help them make and monitor predictions about texts. They watch short introductions to two video segments and make predictions about what the segments will include. While watching the complete segments, students will monitor their predictions. After reading, students will reflect on whether predicting influenced their comprehension of the texts.

        Why is this an important concept?

        Making and monitoring predictions aids readers' comprehension of text as they form questions about what they're reading. It also helps them to monitor their understanding, think about the main idea of the text, and recall events.

        Grade Level:

        6-8

        Suggested Time

        50-minutes

        Media Resources

        Materials

        The Lesson

        Part I: Learning Activity

        1. Ask students, 'If I were to tell you to clear your desks, take out a piece of paper, and put your name on it, what would you predict was going to happen next?' Write students' responses on the blackboard. Then say, 'What if the next instruction was to number your paper 1 through 10. Which of these predictions might still be accurate? Which might you revise? What predictions might you add?' Discuss the predicting strategies students used in this exercise.

        2. Ask what it means to predict, how you predict, and how predicting might help you understand texts more fully. Distribute copies of the Pet Advice Predictions handout and discuss each question.

        3. Practice making and monitoring predictions. Show the first minute of segment 1, "Pet Advice", and pause the segment just before the two men go up on the porch and knock on the door. Provide a media focus by asking students to listen for clues to what they think the rest of the segment will be about. Students should only watch and listen this time; they should not write answers yet.

        4. Discuss with the class what they predict the rest of the segment will be about based upon what they saw in the first minute. Review the questions in Step 1 of the handout.

        5. Play the segment once more and pause it again after the first minute. Ask students to respond to each question in Step 1 of the handout. Instruct students to be very specific, give details, and consider a realm of possibilities that are logically based on the clues given in the segment so far. Stress that some predictions may be inaccurate but as long as they are logically based on clues from the text, they cannot be considered wrong. Allow time for students to complete Step 1. Then give students two minutes to share their responses with a partner. Students may add to their handout as needed.

        6. Discuss responses to Step 1 with the entire class. Students may revise their responses as needed.

        7. As students watch the remainder of segment 1, ask them to listen for information that will help them confirm or revise their predictions. Show remainder of segment.

        8. After viewing, students complete Step 2 of the handout. Give them two minutes to share what they wrote with a classmate and add to their notes. Share in a whole-class discussion.

        9. Discuss Step 3, and then allow students to complete it independently.

        For students who need additional teacher guidance:
        • Provide opportunities for students to view the segments additional times, pausing at points that reveal whether or not their predictions were accurate.
        • Provide more practice. Include various text genres and reading levels.
        • Select texts carefully. Some texts are easier to predict than others. Scaffold practice texts as student work towards independence.

        Part II: Assessment

        1. Distribute the Jamaica Bay Predictions Assessment handout.

        2. Explain to students that they're going to watch a video segment called "Jamaica Bay" and that you are going to pause the video after one minute. As they watch the first minute, ask them to look and listen for clues indicating what the rest of the video segment will include. Students watch and listen first, without writing notes. Pause after the first minute.

        3. Students complete Step 1 of the assessment handout. Instruct students to be very specific, give details, and consider a realm of possibilities that are logically based on the clues given in the segment so far.

        4. Play the remainder of the segment, asking students to monitor their predictions from Step 1.

        5. After viewing, students complete Steps 2 and 3 of the assessment handout.

        6. Score using the Jamaica Bay Predictions rubric.

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