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        Using Story Elements to Write a Rap

        A storyteller uses the elements of a story: who, what and where, to create a rap. After watching the video, students use story elements to write and perform their own raps. Identifying story elements, such as the setting, characters, and motivation, helps readers interpret and respond to a text. Focusing on key details of story elements supports the understanding of the author's message and purpose.

         

        Lesson Summary

        Overview

        A storyteller uses the elements of a story: who, what and where, to create a rap. After watching the video, students use story elements to write and perform their own raps.

        Why is this an important concept?

        Identifying story elements, such as the setting, characters, and motivation, helps readers interpret and respond to a text. Focusing on key details of story elements supports the understanding of the author's message and purpose.

        Grade Level:

        1-4

        Suggested Time

        (1-3) 50-minute periods

        Media Resources

        Materials

        The Lesson

        Part I: Learning Activity

        1. Make copies of the following handouts for each student: Story Element Form handout and Coco at the Beach Lyrics. (If students work in small groups, make a copy for each group.)

        2. Tell students they're going to write a rap. First write "who""what" and "where" on the board and tell students that these are three important questions to answer when writing a story.

        3. Introduce the video segment and provide a focus for viewing: While watching the video segment, think about the answers to these questions:

        • Who is the story about?
        • Where does the story take place?
        • What is the story about?

        4. After watching the video segment, discuss the story elements students observed. On the Story Element Form, students list the main characters, setting, and what the story was about, also noting what motivated the main character.

        5. You may choose to place students in pairs or small groups to complete the Story Element Form.

        For students who need additional teacher guidance:

        • Introduce the story elements "who, what and where" and describe to students how each is important to creating a story. Write the three elements on the board on three separate columns. Use a well known sample story like Goldilocks and the Three Bears and ask students to think about "who," "what" and "where" for this story. Write their responses in the appropriate columns on the board.
        • Next, watch the video segment. Provide a focus for viewing: Listen to the rap and answer the following questions: Who is the story about, where does the story take place and what is the story about?
        • After viewing, guide students as they write the characters, setting and description of the story on the Story Element Form handout.
        • Tell students they'll write their own rap using story elements. Brainstorm topics that would be interesting to their peers and about which they could write a rap. Model how to plan and write a rap. Think aloud during the process to demonstrate how you make decisions about what you write.

        Part II: Assessment

        1. Students work by themselves, in pairs, or in small groups to create a rap. Ask students to begin by using the Story Element Form to plan the "who, what, and where" elements of the raps. Students then use these story elements to write the rap. Ask students to think about what will motivate the main character they create.

        2. Review the video clip to provide an example.

        3. You may choose to give students time to practice performing their raps.

        4. Later, allow time for each group to perform their rap in front of the class.

        5. Use the Rap Story Element rubric to evaluate the written rap.

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