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        6-8

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        Point of View - Rhinoceros

        Students write a journal entry in which they imagine themselves as the rhinoceros and describe its journey to a new preserve.

        Lesson Summary

        Overview

        Students will watch two video segments in order to take notes and answer questions about the relocation of the black rhinoceros to wildlife preserves across Africa. Using this background information, students will write a journal entry in which they imagine themselves as the rhinoceros and describe its journey to a new preserve.

        Why is this an important concept?

        Learners who can identify with a character and describe a situation from the character’s point of view are able to interpret and respond to the situations of characters from all genres of literature. Also, learners who can utilize personification to help them relate to nonhuman characters in a text can further develop this ability to create their own fictional characters and plotlines.

        Grade Level:

        6-8

        Suggested Time

        (3) 45-minute periods

        Media Resources

        Materials

        The Lesson

        Part I: Learning Activity

        1. Provide the purpose for this activity: to learn about the relocation of the black rhinoceros to areas in Africa where they are becoming scarce and write a journal entry discussing one rhino’s relocation from the rhino's point of view. Check for prior knowledge by asking students if they are aware of strategies to address protecting endangered species.

        2. Next distribute Rhinoceros Capture Questions handout. As students watch the Rhinoceros Capture QuickTime Video, remind them to use as many specific details from the video as possible to answer the questions about the conditions the rhinos face and their journey. Show the segment twice so students can review the clip and confirm the details they included in their answers.

        3. After viewing, discuss the segment with students. Ask them to share their answers with the class during a teacher-guided question and answer session. Focus on the video details students use to support and explain their answers. Students add to their answers as needed.

        4. Distribute Rhinoceros Release Questions handout. Provide a focus for viewing the Rhinoceros Release QuickTime Video by asking students to think about how the rhino might have felt when he was first placed in the boma and how his reactions change as his environments change. Students answer questions while watching the video. Show the second video segment again so students can confirm and add to answers.

        5. After viewing, discuss segment. Ask them to share their answers with the class during a teacher-guided question and answer session. Focus on the video details students use to support and explain their answers. Students add to their answers as needed.

        6. Collect questions and look them over before Day 2. Meet with students who need extra help outlining the details of the rhino’s journey before the Day 2 lesson.

        Part II: Assessment

        1. Hand back students’ question handouts and distribute the Rhinoceros Journal Entry. Tell students they will be writing a journal describing the black rhino’s relocation to a new wildlife preserve from the rhino’s point of view. Review all journal directions with students. Remind students that in order to write a strong journal, they must use personification to give human qualities to something that is not human - i.e., the rhinoceros.

        2. Have students brainstorm various human qualities and responses that they believe the rhinoceros may have in order to thoroughly describe what happens to him (e.g., anger, fear, loneliness). Guide a question and answer session to help students develop this list of qualities. Have the list posted in the front of the room for all the students to refer to during the writing process.

        3. Distribute and discuss the Rhinoceros Journal rubric so students know the expectations of the journal.  

        4. Students write rough drafts of their journals using both video segments and both questions handouts, the brainstormed lists of qualities and rubric as a guide.

        5. Students complete the first draft for homework if needed.

        For students who need additional guidance:

        • Meet with students between lessons to support their note-taking and journal-writing skills.
        • If needed, arrange for students to watch videos again.
        • Use listed websites to find additional details about black rhinos, as well as proofreading guidelines on the writer’s website.

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