All Subjects
      All Types

        Info

        Grades

        6-12

        Permitted Use

        Stream and Download


        Part of Ken Burns
        1 Favorites
        59 Views

        Yellowstone National Park | Ken Burns: The National Parks

        View images of tourists and wildlife taken at Yellowstone National Park. In 1872, Yellowstone became the first National Park in the world. Located in the state of Wyoming, with parts stretching into Montana and Idaho, it boasts two million miles of remote terrain. Yellowstone has mountain ranges, deep canyons, rock formations, rivers and lakes, diverse wildlife, and geothermal activity in the form of sulphur springs and geysers. Theodore Roosevelt fought to protect the Park from poachers and vandals. Photographers like Ansel Adams, presidents like Franklin D. Roosevelt, and biologists like George Melendez Wright were drawn to its unearthly beauty.

        Teddy Roosevelt Arrives at Yellowstone, 1903 | Ken Burns: The National Parks

        Roosevelt camped in Yellowstone for two weeks in 1903. The park idea, he said, is "noteworthy in its essential democracy...one of the best bits of national achievement, which our people have to their credit." Source: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream and Download

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        × Close

        Tourist Family in Yellowstone National Park, 1958 | Ken Burns: The National Parks

        After World War II, Park attendance skyrocketed as millions of families began pouring into the parks on vacations that became an American rite of passage. Source: Yellowstone National Park.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream and Download

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        × Close

        Yellowstone Tourist and a Bear, ca. 1940 | Ken Burns: The National Parks

        Feeding bears in the Park resulted in injured tourists and problem bears being put down. Naturalists like George Melendez Wright and Adolph Murie got the Park Service to change policies to allow bears, and other wildlife, to exist in a more natural state. Source: Source: Yellowstone National Park.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream and Download

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        × Close

        Black Bear Begs for Food at a Yellowstone Roadside, 1937 | Ken Burns: The National Parks

        Park regulations discouraged tourists from feeding bears, but few people obeyed them. Eventually, at the prodding of biologists, the bears were weaned from handouts and nightly feedings at garbage dumps. Source: Harpers Ferry, National Park Service Historic Photograph Collection.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream and Download

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        × Close

        Old Faithful Erupting, Yellowstone National Park, ca. 1878-1885 | Ken Burns: The National Parks

        The photographs of William Henry Jackson, a member of the Hayden expedition's survey of Yellowstone, played a crucial role in convincing Congress to set the geological wonderland aside as the world's first national park in 1872. Source: United States Geological Survey.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream and Download

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        × Close

        Franklin Roosevelt, Yellowstone National Park, 1937 | Ken Burns: The National Parks

        Despite his disability, President Franklin Roosevelt loved to visit National Parks. He encouraged all Americans to do likewise, even during the hard times of the Great Depression. Here he views the Lower Falls of Yellowstone River. Source: National Archives and Records Administration.

        Permitted Use:

        Stream and Download

        Accessibility:


        Transcript:


        Download:

        × Close

        Contributor:

        You must be logged in to use this feature

        Need an account?
        Register Now